David Myatt

David Myatt

 

It is interesting and perhaps instructive to compare the stories of Joe Pierce, a former member of the National Front (NF), and David Myatt, founder of the 1970s NDFM (National Democratic Freedom Movement) and the 1990s National-Socialist Movement (NSM), convert to Islam, and public supporter of terrorism.

In summary, Pierce gained a certain notoriety in the late 1970s as editor of the NF zine Bulldog; was twice sent to prison for short periods for inciting racial hatred, became a friend of Nick Griffin, moved to Northern Ireland for a while to support Protestant groups against the IRA, then later on (as so many reprobates seem to do) found God, became a practising Catholic, was fêted by the Catholic Church, by the media, and by Establishment figures, gave public lectures, wrote about his experience, and was given a sinecure in academia. His life story is told in Race with the Devil: My Journey from Racial Hatred to Rational Love published by St. Benedict’s Press, and he is written about in glowing terms by journalists and academics alike.

In summary, Myatt was active in neo-nazi politics for some thirty years, was sent to prison twice for violence, organized and led a gang of criminals, founded the short-lived but violent NDFM, became for around two years a Catholic monk before returning to neo-nazi politics; was a member of Combat 18, founded and led the NSM; is notorious for writing the terrorist manual that inspired the London nail-bomber David Copeland; became “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution” {1}; has been accused of being the founder of the Occult group the Order of Nine Angles (O9A); converted to Islam and publicly supported al-Qaida and the Taliban, wrote one the most detailed defences, in English, of suicide attacks (an article used by the terrorist group Hamas), translated Ancient Greek literature, became an apostate from Islam, developed his own mystical philosophy centred about empathy and compassion. He wrote about his life in his autobiography Myngath, published in 2013 {2} and has written extensively about why he rejected extremism in books such as Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination, published in 2013.

Unlike Pierce, Myatt – despite his more interesting and more violent past, his more diverse experiences over some forty years, his greater notoriety, his extensive writings as a neo-nazi ideologue, his far greater involvement with terrorism – was and is shunned by Establishment figures, is ignored by academics, and when mentioned by journalists or in mainstream books it is often in a derogatory and/or prejudiced manner and often accompanied by the unproven allegation of him being involved with the O9A.

Why the disparity, given that both by their own admission are reformed racists who regret their extremist pasts? Why the disparity in their treatment by the Establishment especially as Myatt is considered as having been “one of the more interesting figures on the British neo-Nazi scene since the 1970s” {3}{4}{5} whose active involvement with extremism lasted for some forty years while Pierce was a minor figure on the far-right whose involvement with extremism lasted for a far shorter period of time.

My surmise is that the disparity is due to the fact that Pierce is now part of the Establishment – a publicly repentant sinner who has accepted the Christian God and who continues to write, and continues to publicly speak about, what the Establishment approves of – while Myatt is a recluse whose mystical philosophy (the way of pathei-mathos) is essentially pagan. In addition, there is (i) the fact that Myatt has made – both as a neo-nazi and as a radical Muslim – powerful and influential enemies whose mottos are “Never again” and “Never forget, never forgive”, and (ii) that Myatt’s neo-nazi writings (despite his disavowal of them) still resonant with some people within the neo-nazi community, and (iii) that so many people within the modern Satanist and Occult movements continue to believe (without any evidence) that Myatt is Anton Long and the founder of and the driving force behind the subversive, anti-Establishment, Order of Nine Angles.

Myatt thus seems to have become, by some individuals involved with some sub-cultures (occult and otherwise) not only some sort of iconoclastic anti-Establishment figure but also disliked and reviled by many more individuals around the world who have apparently developed a prejudice against him. Thus Pierce is given the benefit of the doubt, and believed, while Myatt is not.

Unless and until there is a critical, scholarly, biography (or two) of Myatt then this prejudiced view of Myatt by so many people is unlikely to change in any significant way. But what is certain is that his many detractors do aid the growth of the now well-established ‘Myatt mythos’.

RS
July 2016

{1} Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (USAF), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.
{2} Myngath: Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life. ISBN 978-1484110744. A review of Myngath is here: https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/a-review-of-myngath/
{3} The Observer, February 9, 2003.
{4} Arkadiusz Sołtysiak. Neopogaństwo i neonazizm: Kilka słów o ideologiach Davida Myatta i Varga Vikernesa. Antropologia Religii. Wybór esejów. Tom IV, (2010), s. 173-182
{5} Jeffrey Kaplan (ed.). David Wulstan Myatt, in Encyclopedia of White Power. A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, CA 2000, p. 216ff; p.514f