Order of Nine Angles

O9A

Western Pagan Curses: Some Examples
(pdf)

It is interesting and informative – and should be part of the studies of every aspirant Western sorcerer and sorceress – to research the history of Western sorcery especially given that most aspirant Occultists will begin and have (for over a century) begun, and will and have ended, with the Magian ‘Goetic’ (qabalistic) tradition, satisfied as they seem to be, and seem to have been, that that Magian medieval tradition is ‘authentic’ especially as that qabalistic tradition formed the basis for the sorcery of the so-called Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, for the sorcery of Mr Crowley, for the sorcery of Howard Levey, for the sorcery of Mr Aquino, and for the sorcery of all other modern, non-O9A, occult groups.

To provide a flavour of the Western, pagan, tradition of sorcery – free from later Magian (Judaic) interpolations and distortions – we present here three examples of historical Western sorcery. One from the sorcery inspired by ancient Greece and Hellenism, and two from Romano-British, pagan, sources. Perspicacious readers will notice several things. For example, that Romano-British sorcery – spells and curses – make no reference whatsoever to Magian ‘demons’, and that earlier Hellenic sorcery is also devoid of later Magian (Judaic) interpolations.

K.S.
June 2017


David Myatt

David Myatt

Given his weird Faustian peregrinations, much has been written (mostly negatively, and both past and present) about David Myatt, although there is no denying that he was, and is, “a British iconoclast who has lived a somewhat itinerant life”, {1} and that he is “one of the more interesting figures on the British neo-Nazi scene since the 1970s” {2}.

That Myatt’s post-2011 philosophy of pathei-mathos is firmly rooted in both European paganism and Greco-Roman culture {3} is further evidence that his roots – despite his experiential forays into Islam (both Sunni and Shia) and despite his post-2011 denunciations of ‘extremism’ – still are in Western culture. As is so evidenced in Myatt’s translations of and commentaries on the classic Western text titled Corpus Hermeticism. A text important to and part of, the European Renaissance and which texts vivified scholars such as Marsilio Ficino, Renaissance potentates such as Cosimo di Giovanni de Medici, and scientists such as Isaac Newton.

Indeed, Myatt in his Preface to his forthcoming translation of tractate XI of the Corpus Hermeticism, writes that:

“The intention of these translations of mine of various tractates of the Corpus Hermeticum is provide an alternative, and esoteric and essentially pagan Greco-Roman, approach to such ancient texts and hopefully renew interest in them beyond conventional and past interpretations which – based on using terms such as God, Mind, and Soul – makes them appear to be either proto-Christian or imbued with an early Christian weltanschauung.” {4}

In addition, his much-neglected poetry {5} stands as a paeon to both the European land of England and to the life of a Western mystic.

That Myatt’s poetry, his translations of Greek classics {6}, and his pagan philosophy of pathei-mathos, are neglected is perhaps tribute indeed to how so many Western peoples are now, and have been for decades, in thrall to the ethos and propaganda of the anti-Western Magian and their savants.

So, is David Myatt an intellectual, Faustian, and mystic, icon of the pagan soul of the West?

RS
2017

{1} Jon B. Perdue: The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71.

{2} The Observer, February 9, 2003.

{3} The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt. ISBN 978-1523930135. Also available at: https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/mystic-philosophy-myatt-v1a.pdf

{4} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/tractate-xi-extract/

{5} qv. https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2011/09/21/relict-a-selection-of-poems/

{6} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/about/greek-translations/