David Myatt

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Swan Song Of A Mystic?

The latest effusion from Mr David Myatt, titled Some Questions For DWM 2017, is interesting for a variety of reasons not least of which is that it is permeated – as is his philosophy of pathei-mathos – with references to the classical culture of ancient Greece and Rome. It is also – perhaps unintentionally – revealing about Myatt’s character providing as it does facts about his life and how he now views his philosophy of pathei-mathos, which philosophy he has previously described as his weltanschauung, his own outlook on life.

The overall impression is of a man steeped in Western culture who is still ineluctably part of that culture but who – even though already withdrawn from the world – desires as a mystic might to cut what few ties still bind him to the world of vanity and materialism.

The Philosophy of Pathei Mathos

One of these ties appears to be his philosophy of pathei-mathos. This is a philosophy which is not only clearly pagan and part of the Western philosophical tradition {1} but also one which provides we Westerners with a cultured – a philosophical – paganism relevant to the modern world which is completely different from and even at odds with what has been termed both “contemporary paganism” and “neopaganism” with its invented rituals and ceremonies, its belief in and revival of ancient deities, and its lack of philosophical rigour. In effect, Myatt has continued, refined, and evolved the Western paganism – the ancient, the classical, paganism – evident in the works Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Cicero, the Corpus Hermeticum, and Marcus Aurelius, stripping away the old idea of gods and goddesses and replacing them with a modern mysticism centred around philosophical concepts such as Being and physis {2}, and virtues such as personal honour, pathei mathos, and empathy. Such a philosophical approach also conveniently does away – sans polemics – with conventional religions such as Christianity. {3}

Why then – given this gift to those seeking a Western alternative to the likes of Christianity who are unable to take “contemporary paganism” and “neopaganism” seriously – does Myatt in his latest effusion seem, as some have commented, to reject his own pagan philosophy? For among other things he writes,

“All that ‘philosophy’ seems to be to me now is a rather wordy and a rather egoistic, vainful, attempt to present what I (rightly or wrongly) believed I had learned about myself and the world as a result of various experiences.”

My own view is that he is not rejecting that philosophy, only moving on, as a composer of musical works – finding themselves unsatisfied with their creations – moves on to other things, to new compositions. In other words, Myatt is only re-expressing what he said some years ago, which was that the philosophy of pathei-mathos was

“simply my own weltanschauung, a weltanschauung developed over some years as a result of my own pathei-mathos. Thus, and despite whatever veracity it may or may not possess, it is only the personal insight of one very fallible individual.” {4}

In Myatt’s case he is simply moving on to concentrate on translations, and to live as his conscience dictates, or rather as his own pathei mathos informs him he should, which is life as a modern recluse and a learned mystic.

That he is not rejecting his own philosophy but instead is just not going to write anymore about it – or as he says, is not going to “pontificate” about it anymore – is evident in two of his replies. For in one reply he writes “I would suggest the tentative answers expressed by my weltanschauung,” while in another that such philosophical essays “can be, and in my case seem to have been, manifestations of vanity.”

But whether he will really write no more philosophical essays remains to be seen for there have been many writers, artists and musicians who, having forsworn their craft, nevertheless return to it at some stage.

A Western Heritage

In his latest effusion Myatt acknowledges his Western heritage, writing that as a schoolboy he read in Greek the likes of Thucydides, Homer, Plato, Aristotle, and Herodotus, and in a rather remarkable admission that what he

“imbibed in those early years from such books of Ancient Hellas was nothing particularly philosophical but instead martial, and I could not but help admire those ‘thinking warriors’, those ‘perspicacious inventive gentlemen’ (περιφραδὴς ἀνήρ as Sophocles described them, cunning in inventive arts who arrive now with dishonour and then with honour, τι τὸ μηχανόεν τέχνας ὑπὲρ ἐλπίδ ̓ἔχων τοτὲ μὲν κακόν, ἄλλοτ ̓ ἐπ ̓ ἐσθλὸν ἕρπει) nurtured as I was then and had been for years by and in various colonies and outposts of what was still the British Empire. Thus it was natural that when, a short time later, I first learned about the Third Reich and about the loyalty of a soldier such as Otto Ernst Remer and the heroic actions of warriors such as Leon Degrelle I admired such men and intuited that something of the warrior ethos of ancient Hellas and Sparta may have manifested itself in our modern world.”

He also admits that

“some aspects of some of the tractates of the Corpus Hermeticum have influenced my thinking, just as Aristotle, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Marcus Aurelius, and other classical and Hellenistic Greek and Latin writers have.”

That he does not mention any non-Western literature I find indicative.

Thus it is my view that Myatt – despite some of his past peregrinations or perhaps because of some of those peregrinations – is still rooted in and still contributing to the ethos of the West, a fact evident in his philosophy of pathei-mathos and also in his on-going translations of texts from the Corpus Hermeticum and his on-going translation of the Gospel of John, both of which are important for understanding the past and the current ethos of the West itself particularly as Myatt notes, in one of his replies, that his presumption is “of early Christianity probably being influenced by the diverse hermetic traditions which existed and flourished during the Hellenistic period.”

This rootedness in the culture of the West is also evident in another of his replies, with Myatt lamenting that

“for so many in the modern West there is no longer an ancestral culture of which one is a living, dwelling, part – a connexion between the past and the future and a connexion with a rural place of dwelling – and which culture preserves the slowly learned wisdom of the past.”

Like a few others, my view is that his philosophy of pathei-mathos as well as his translations provide some of the links we need to reconnect ourselves with our Western ancestral culture.

Rachael Stirling
August 2017

{1} See https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/2016/01/14/a-modern-pagan-philosophy/
{2} In one of his replies Myatt writes that in his philosophy “the apparent parts of the unity are expressed by descriptors such as masculous and muliebral, with that unity – The One, μονάς – not designated by terms such as theos (God, god) or theoi (gods) but rather metaphysically, as Being and the emanations/effluvia of Being such as ourselves, Nature, and the Cosmos itself.”
{3} A detailed analysis of Myatt’s philosophy is given in the 2016 book The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt, which is available as a free download – https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/a-modern-mystic – and as a printed book, ISBN 978-1523930135
{4} The Way Of Pathei-Mathos – A Précis. The essay is in the 2014 compilation titled One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods: Some Personal and Metaphysical Musings.


David Myatt

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Questions For David Myatt (2017)
(pdf)

 


Source: https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/questions-for-dwm-2017/
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Related:
Swan Song Of A Mystic?

David Myatt

David Myatt

Given his weird Faustian peregrinations, much has been written (mostly negatively, and both past and present) about David Myatt, although there is no denying that he was, and is, “a British iconoclast who has lived a somewhat itinerant life”, {1} and that he is “one of the more interesting figures on the British neo-Nazi scene since the 1970s” {2}.

That Myatt’s post-2011 philosophy of pathei-mathos is firmly rooted in both European paganism and Greco-Roman culture {3} is further evidence that his roots – despite his experiential forays into Islam (both Sunni and Shia) and despite his post-2011 denunciations of ‘extremism’ – still are in Western culture. As is so evidenced in Myatt’s translations of and commentaries on the classic Western text titled Corpus Hermeticism. A text important to and part of, the European Renaissance and which texts vivified scholars such as Marsilio Ficino, Renaissance potentates such as Cosimo di Giovanni de Medici, and scientists such as Isaac Newton.

Indeed, Myatt in his Preface to his forthcoming translation of tractate XI of the Corpus Hermeticism, writes that:

“The intention of these translations of mine of various tractates of the Corpus Hermeticum is provide an alternative, and esoteric and essentially pagan Greco-Roman, approach to such ancient texts and hopefully renew interest in them beyond conventional and past interpretations which – based on using terms such as God, Mind, and Soul – makes them appear to be either proto-Christian or imbued with an early Christian weltanschauung.” {4}

In addition, his much-neglected poetry {5} stands as a paeon to both the European land of England and to the life of a Western mystic.

That Myatt’s poetry, his translations of Greek classics {6}, and his pagan philosophy of pathei-mathos, are neglected is perhaps tribute indeed to how so many Western peoples are now, and have been for decades, in thrall to the ethos and propaganda of the anti-Western Magian and their savants.

So, is David Myatt an intellectual, Faustian, and mystic, icon of the pagan soul of the West?

RS
2017

{1} Jon B. Perdue: The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71.

{2} The Observer, February 9, 2003.

{3} The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt. ISBN 978-1523930135. Also available at: https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/mystic-philosophy-myatt-v1a.pdf

{4} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/tractate-xi-extract/

{5} qv. https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2011/09/21/relict-a-selection-of-poems/

{6} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/about/greek-translations/


Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Editorial Note: We reproduce here an interesting article which mentions David Myatt in relation to such modern mystics as Julius Evola. It seems that a few select individuals actually do appreciate Myatt’s contribution to Western (esoteric) mysticism.

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Brutalism I
The almighty Sol

I have just finished my artistic exploration of the Sphere of Venus as part of my intent to symbolize the whole Tree of Wyrd, as a sign of my dedication to the Sinister Tradition.

A lot has already been written about the Sphere of Venus, the astrological aspects of Venus, so no need to copy them. Also the Sphere of Venus has already been described in the Mss of the ONA. There are a few things I have personally added through my exploration of its singular power.

First of all, and part of the exoteric strategy of the ONA, the reference to one of the most ancient symbols of the West, namely the magickal script of the Runes. Specifically for Venus I have drawn the Othala and Fehu Runes.

Fehu

Fehu, of course, as the Rune of Freya, the most powerful goddess of love, war and sexual attraction of the Northern pantheon. Fehu’s energy stands for the Will-to-Power, Sexual power, Feminine and matriarchal Power. The Rune itself means ‘cattle’ and stood for mobile wealth. But I prefer not to pay attention to the ‘materialistic’ connotation of this Rune as materialism is already the main focus in the West nowadays. The Rune’s spiritual power lies however in the energy, the transference from the acausal to the causal through Love/agape, in the ability to feel empathy, to feel connected with your folk around you, good friends, soul mates, between lovers but also the connection with Nature, your Heimat. This also denotes wealth, but a spiritual one. Being, as Heidegger wrote, is always a being there (Dasein) as we are thrown into this world (Gefallenheit) we are here with others and the Other. There is the transference of energy, of experiences which we are building on and how we shape who and what we are at this moment, but always with a higher aim. For those who are able to ‘feel’ Fehu, to feel the green glow of Venus, reassuring yet tantalizing, know that there is something Eternal calling us. As Myatt described this very well: there is no division between us, ipseity is just an illusion and ipseities offer us no answer, no matter how we are longing after definite answers. The Sphere of Venus offers no answer, but its green colour, one of the colours of Nature, can actually soothe us. Not soothing us ‘to sleep’ but actually an awakening, a break-through.

The feeling of empathy and compassion is one through which we become humble again, (as opposed to the ‘Black Magic’ formulas of becoming gods), and then we are ready to receive the richness from the acausal. The Sinister demands one to go beyond one’s limits and to leave the Ego behind. Just like in the alchemical Opus we have to become a vessel ready to accept without hesitation. The same applies to showing compassion: we can learn to love, to hold on. Agape is a Greek term which refers to such a state of mind and which is far more spiritual than the word ‘love’ that is used nowadays. Agape refers to a state of mind which destroys all illusions and puts us in an unconditional position. Unconditionally religious (religare = to connect). A most orthodox state of mind. Bataille demanded us to be ferociously religious. And we will not contradict him!

Bataille also referred to ‘love’ and ‘friendship’ as forms of wordless communication, a communication without demands, words, and this puts one in a delicate position almost defenceless. One enters the energetic Continuous where boundaries by definitions no longer apply. When I meditate I open my being-there to the World, and I let go of all my thoughts by casting them aways as illusionary. Agape is for those who are committed to an acephalic path of pure, selfless commitment. The ‘I’ is no longer present, one is devoted to a higher cause, devoted to the happiness of a friend or lover, to the spiritual realization of one’s Wyrd, the Wyrd of the West. A Higher Destiny of which Spengler and Heidegger wrote. Agape is also a Christian term, but one should not be afraid of it, or cast it aside as something ‘un-satanic’ or ‘weak’, for the term goes beyond all morality: to feel connected is a naturalistic essence. It goes beyond ‘good & evil’ and orthodox Christianity (its roots being Gnostic) is well aware of that.

We are all driven by a thrist, a longing, a will-to-power (Buddhist tanha), and we all have the need to satisfy this but let us not focus on that kind of easy satisfaction. Those urges and cravings steer us away from any possibility to inter-connect, to feel the energy drawn from the acausal to the causal.

Othala

The Othala Rune’s energy denotes the spiritual inheritance from our ancestors, our people, the land where we have been raised, its traditions, its folklore, its customs. What can we learn from those traditions that also played an important role in Europe such those of the Greeks, the Romans, the Arabs, Christianity and gnosticism. What can we learn from them? I genuinely believe in an Wordless tradition, a Tradition of the Soul which has been causally transferred through the ages into the Alchemical Tradition of the Great Work. The Sinister Tradition and my particular acephalic path are based on those ancient insights, add new ideas but are loyal to the Tradition.

Now, the Othala Rune exoterically reconnects me to my Heimat, the environment where I have been raised and which strenghtens me to honour those ancients Traditions. Albeit there being different high cultures (Greek, Roman, Arab, Christian) this is not about modern-day multiculturalism. Multiculturalism is only focussed on the causal (food, spice, habits and so on) while an über-cultural Tradition is about the lifting of the Soul, about what Jung referred as a collective unconcious. The Green sphere of Venus can be seen as nurturing that feeling of connecting again.

Another important aspect of the Othala Runes can be traced back to nobilitas, nobility, being noble. And this is an important element if we desire to grow spiritually, to evolve further and further away from the pathetic state of the mundanes in order to realise the Nietzschean Overman. Hence the connection with the Fehu Rune in the Sphere of Venus.

The Wet Path

Alchemically speaking this is the Sphere of Conjunction (in Naos one refers to Coagulation but I cannot agree with this). In the Hermetic Arts Conjunction occurs when a synthesis, a conjunctio occurs of the anima and the animus, the unconscious and conscious, the natural and that which one knows. One must therefore enter the Continuous and start to look introspectively: the Geist must turn towards itself (the inner change of which Myatt writes) instead of always looking at the outside. We must let ourselves be seduced by the Numinous or what Bataille calls the Sacred. Situated in the Sphere of Venus we talke about the Feminine principle, the eternal-Female which has always been honoured in the Satanic manifestation of the Numinous Sinister Tradition. This is quite a revolution as most Satanic ipseities are male oriented, and regard the female as being submissive, to be controlled. In that opinion these paths do not differ from the Magian beliefs they claim to criticize. The Sinister Tradition however is unique because of its utmost respect towards the female. This is based on the Alchemical understanding of the anima and the animus.

The Path of Venus is what is called a wet Path where the practioner is burnt by water. In the wet path of hermetism there also occur sexual symbols. The sexual act can therefore be seen as an alchemical process in which man and woman are united in love. The conjunctio of man and woman is akin to the operation between two vessels:

“the active and passive, the golden force against the captivating and sympathetic wet force that ‘dissolves’ the former and its own ‘enclosure’. […] ‘Our corpereal gold is as though dead before it unites with its mate. Only then is the secret, interior Sulfur developed’. […] ‘With the Sulfur of Venus, the inner sulfur of man is rectified, reinforced and wholly perfected’.” (Julius Evola, The Hermetic Tradition)

Death & Ecstasy

Interestingly, Evola also mentions the fact that the hermetic texts frequently “speak of a death that is a consequence of the coniunctio, of the ‘joining’, perhaps it also refers to the trauma that can occur at the height of the embrace and orgasm if subjected to a deliberate control.” Bataille referred to the orgasm as a ‘little death’ and this is exactly what occurs at the culmination of the sexual act: ecstasy or ekstasis: going beyond of oneself. In this moment of rapture one become headless, acephalic as one transgresses the limits of ipseity. The Sphere of Venus can therefore be deadly as well and the Dark Goddess Darkat reigns most supremely.

Dragon and the Ouroboros

In Naos one can find the symbol Dragon as being atributed to the Sphere of Venus. I have chosen the Ouroboros as it stands for the endless flux of energy, birth and Death, creation and destruction, and I find these aspects united in the Sphere of Venus. Freya as a Goddess embodies both love and war, creation & destruction. The dragon, often described to Mercury with which Venus is connected, devours itself and recreates and archetypically symbolizes the collective UR-grond of the Life Cycle. The attribution to Mercury is perhaps more accurate but Venus does possess such maternal qualities as well for the Water, as they element of Venus, also refers to the maternal water from which we are all born. The Mother as a guardian of the Life Force.

We can therefore conclude that the Sphere of Venus has much to offer to the practitioner. Approach it with the utmost respect. Enjoy the sexual rapture & the mystical Death. Become Acephalic!

Agios O Darkat! 333!
Von S, 128 yf

Literature:

The Hermetic Tradition (Julius Evola)
Alchemie en psychologie
MSS by Myatt


Article source: https://ecstatic-darkness.com/


David Myatt 1998

David Myatt

Perhaps Words Are The Problem

Of the many metaphysical things I have pondered upon in the last five or so years, one is the enigma of words. More specifically, of how nomen – a name, a term, a designation – can not only apparently bring-into-being abstractions (and their categories) but also prescribe both our thinking and our actions, with such abstractions and such prescription so often being used by us, we mortals, to persuade, to entreat, to manipulate, to control, not only ourselves but through us others of our human kind. Whence how denotatum can and so often does distance, distract, us from the essence – the physis – that empathy and its wordless (acausal) knowing can reveal and has for a certain mortals so often in past millennia revealed.

For we seem somehow addicted to talk, to chatter – spoken and written – just as we assume, we believe, so often on the basis of nomina that we expand our pretension of knowing beyond the local horizon of a very personal wordless empathy breeding thus, encouraging thus, such hubris as has so marked our species for perhaps five thousand years. With such hubris – such certitude of knowing – being the genesis of such suffering as we have so often inflicted on others and, sometimes, even upon ourselves.

Would that we could, as a sentient species, dispense with nomen, nomina, and thus communicate with others – and with ourselves – empathically and thus acquire the habit of acausal wordless knowing. There would then be no need for the politics of propaganda and the rhetoric of persuasion; no need – no ability – to lie or pretend to others. For we would be known – wordlessly revealed – for who and what we really are. And what a different world that would be where no lie, no deception, would work and where guilt could never be concealed.

For some, a few mortals, such a wordless knowing is already, and has been for centuries, the numinous reality, born as such a personal reality is either via their pathei-mathos or via their innate physis. Which is perhaps why such others often secrete, or desire to secrete, themselves away: an isolated or secluded family – rural, or island – living, perhaps, and perhaps why Cistercians, some mystics, some artists, and others of a similar numinous kind, have saught to dwell, to live, in reclusive or communal silence.

There is – or so there seems to me to be according to my admittedly, fallible, uncertitude of knowing – a presencing of the essence of almost all religions here in such a knowing of the value, the mysterium, of silence. Of that which we so often in our hubris forget, have forgotten, or never known: that wordless, that empathic, that so very personal acausal knowing, that personal grief and personal suffering – that the personal awareness of the numinous – so often engenders, so often breeds, as has been so recounted for millennia in our human culture of pathei-mathos.

Given this culture – so accessible now through institutions of learning, through printed books, through art, memoirs, and music, and via this medium of this our digital age – shall we, can we, learn and apply the learning of that culture to significantly change our lives, thus somehow avoiding that periodicity of suffering which for millennia our hubris, our certainty of knowing born of nomen and nomina and the resultant abstractions, has inflicted and continues to inflict upon us?

I do so wish I had an answer. But for now, all I can do is dwell in hope of us en masse so evolving that such empathy, such wordless knowing, has become the norm.

David Myatt
2016

Extract From A Letter To A Friend


Source: https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/perhaps-words-are-the-problem/


David Myatt

David Myatt

David Myatt: Relict

How, will, should, David Myatt be remembered? Premature and recent rumors of his death struck a chord with some of us who – whatever our age, whatever our place of dwelling, and whatever our political inclinations – have somehow in some manner (positive or negative) been affected by his life and by his writings.

But someday, and perhaps soon – give or take a few months, a few years, or perhaps a decade or more – he, now a reclusive uncommunicative mystic, will most assuredly be gone from this our mortal realm. So how should, will, Myatt best be remembered?

For myself I choose his poetry. Or rather that compilation of his poems – titled Relict – which he himself compiled. For there is humanism, a numinosity, the ethos of our Western civilization, presenced in such semi-autobiographical poems as are collected there. As well as the quintessence of what, post-2012, became his mystical, his very personal, his decidedly Western, ‘philosophy of pathei-mathos’.

Thus if he is to be remembered it should, perhaps, be for such so very human, so very civilized, poems. For such poems are such an eloquent rebuke to those who have attempted – or who for private or for political reasons may well continue to attempt – to besmirch him.

Relict
(pdf)

RS
2016


Related:

° Four Forgotten Poems


David Myatt

David Myatt

The Mystic Philosophy of David Myatt
(pdf)

Contents:

I. A Modern Mystic: David Myatt And The Way of Pathei-Mathos
II. A Modern Pagan Philosophy
III. Honour In The Philosophy Of Pathei-Mathos
IV. An Overview of The Philosophy of Pathei-Mathos
Appendix. A Note On Greek Terms In The Philosophy Of Pathei-Mathos


David Myatt

David Myatt

The pdf file below contains Myatt’s fourteen page essay Exegesis and Translation, first published in 2013. In the essay Myatt asks pertinent questions about revealed religions and the reliance the majority of believers of such revelations have on translations of their ‘sacred texts’ and the exegesis of others, writing in one memorable passage how

“there seems to be, in revealed religions and most conventional spiritual ways, a rejection of pathei-mathos in favour of the wisdom said to be contained in the texts and thus in the teachings of the founder(s) of the religion/spiritual way, and – in the case of revealed religions – in the writings/edicts of those who have been vested with or who have acquired a certain religious authority, and – also in the case of revealed religions – how such pathei-mathos, to be accepted at all, has to be judged by criteria developed from such texts and/or developed from interpretations of such texts.”

This essay therefore has relevance to Myatt’s philosophy of pathei mathos. It reveals also Myatt’s erudition, with quotations in their original language from the New Testament, the Koran, and Boethius – together with Myatt’s translations – as well as quotations from Beowulf, John Gower, and Morte Arthure.

While Myatt incorporated parts of the essay into some of his book-length works – for instance part of the Translation and Al-Quran section of the essay was added to the appendix of his Poemandres translation {1} – it is informative to read the complete essay, with his comments under the Ontology, Exegesis, and Pathei-Mathos heading in Part One of particular interest.

Exegesis And Translation
(pdf)

 

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{1} David Myatt. Poemandres, A Translation and Commentary. Third Edition, 2014. ISBN 978-1495470684.


 

David Myatt

 

For well over two decades many individuals and some academics have assumed that ‘Anton Long’ is a pseudonym of David Myatt and that Myatt was the founder of, and may still be involved with, the Order of Nine Angles (ONA, O9A).

In addition, a few fanatical and/or obsessed and/or maladjusted individuals, have – and (such is their physis) always anonymously and always via the medium of the internet and for well over a decade – set up “anti-Myatt” internet blogs, websites, and posted interminable and voluminous messages on forums and in the comments sections of other internet blogs, about Myatt; always making derogatory remarks about him and the O9A, often (and laughably) accusing him of various crimes and activities, and sometimes even posting (mostly bad) photo-shopped images of him in various situations.

In some ways, this attention and focus on Myatt is a testament to his iconoclasm {1}, to what an academic {2} described as his complex character, to what another academic termed his “global odyssey which took him on extended stays in the Middle East and East Asia, accompanied by studies of religions ranging from Christianity to Islam in the Western tradition and Taoism and Buddhism in the Eastern path,” {3}, to how he allegedly “managed to enter the scene of grand politics and the global ‘War On Terror’, because of several foiled terror plots in Europe that can be linked to [his] writings,” {4} to why he is considered “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution,” {5} and why he is regarded as “a dangerous man” {6}.

However, what is astonishing is that no one – academic or otherwise – has so far bothered to study, and to rationally, in a scholarly manner, comment on his post-2012 ‘philosophy of pathei-mathos’, on his post-2009 letters, on his voluminous post-2009 personal writings, and on his poetry, despite all of these being freely available on his personal weblog {7}.

For if these items are studied then not only does a new, consistent, picture of Myatt emerge but they also call into question the decades-long assumptions of him being Anton Long and of still being involved with the O9A.

The picture that emerges of David Myatt is of a reclusive mystic, of someone whose philosophy of pathei-mathos is expiative, and who now devotes himself to abstruse, metaphysical, matters, to translating ancient Greek literature, and to, as a poet, pondering the meaning of our existence.

That said, it’s now back to my Quinta Vintage Port…

RS
2016

{1} Jon B. Perdue, The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71.

{2} Susan Raine. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014, pp. 529-533.

{3} Jeffrey Kaplan. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. p. 216ff; p.512f.

{4} Jacob Senholt. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen (eds), The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012

{5} George Michael. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (USAF), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.

{6} Simon Wiesenthal Center: Response, Summer 2003, Vol 24, #2.

{7} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/


Botticelli-Madonna-del-Magnificat-3

Editorial Note: The following extract is from Myatt’s 2012 essay Fifty Years Of Diverse Peregrinations and which essay he included in his 2013 book Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos: Essays and Letters Regarding Spirituality, Humility, and A Learning From Grief available as that book is both as a free e-text (myatt-religion-and-pathei-mathos.pdf ) and as a printed book, ISBN 9781484097984.

°°°

In fifty years of diverse peregrinations – which included forty years of practical involvement with various religions and spiritual ways, practical involvement with extremisms both political and religious, and some seven years of intense interior reflexion occasioned by a personal tragedy – I have come to appreciate and to admire what the various religions and the diverse spiritual ways have given to us over some three thousand years.

Thus have I sensed that our world is, and has been, a better place because of them and that we, as a sentient species, are en masse better because of them. Thus it is that I personally – even though I have developed my own non-religious weltanschauung – have a great respect for religions such as Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Sikhism; for spiritual ways such as Buddhism, Taoism; for older paganisms such as (i) θεοί and Μοῖραι τρίμορφοι μνήμονές τ᾽ Ἐρινύες, and (ii) άγνωστος θεός, and for the slowly evolving more recent paganisms evident for instance in a spiritual concern for the welfare of our planet and for the suffering we have for so long inflicted on other humans and on the other life with which we share this planet.

Unsurprisingly, therefore, I disagree with those who, often intemperate in words or deeds – or both – disrespectfully fail to appreciate such religions and spiritual ways and the treasure, the culture, the pathei-mathos, that they offer, concentrating as such intemperate people so often do on what they perceive to be or feel to be are the flaws, the mistakes, of such religions and such spiritual ways while so often ignoring (as such people tend to do) their own personal flaws, their own mistakes, as well as the reality that it is we humans beings – with our ὕβρις, with our lack of humility, our lack of appreciation for the numinous, and with our intolerance and our often arrogant and harsh interpretations of such religions – who have been the cause and who continue to be the cause of such suffering as has blighted and as still blights this world.

As Heraclitus mentioned over two thousand years ago:

ὕβριν χρὴ σβεννύναι μᾶλλον ἢ πυρκαϊὴν 

Better to deal with your hubris before you confront that fire

David Myatt
2012