Demonizing David Myatt

David Myatt

David Myatt

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Editorial Note: In view of recent allegations about David Myatt {1} we republish here a 2017 article which makes some interesting points, especially regarding how supporters of the O9A, anti-fascists, and others have a vested interest in “demonizing” Myatt and his life.

In addition, as noted in the article Two Reformed Racists {2},

“It is interesting and perhaps instructive to compare the stories of Joe Pearce, a former member of the National Front (NF), and David Myatt, founder of the 1970s NDFM (National Democratic Freedom Movement) and the 1990s National-Socialist Movement (NSM), convert to Islam, and public supporter of terrorism.”

RDM Crew
May 2019 ev

{1} Refer to https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/2019/03/04/twelve-basic-errors/
{2} https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/two-reformed-racists/

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Demonizing Mr Myatt

Background

For the past seven or eight years – including in recent months – there have been attempts made to ‘demonize’ David Myatt all based on the unproven allegation that he is Anton Long of Order of Nine Angles fame.

These attempts have been made both by some individuals associating themselves with the Order of Nine Angles (ONA, O9A) and by those who for whatever reason or from whatever motive are opposed to the O9A or to Myatt himself. Such O9A opponents include self-described modern Satanists as well those who profess to be followers of Jesus and those who take exception to what they believe is the pro-Nazi stance of the O9A.

Those who are opposed to Myatt himself include anti-fascists who profess such slogans as “never forgive, never forget” and who thus cannot forgive or forget Myatt’s neo-nazi past, {1} and individuals who for unconscious emotive reasons of their own are in some way either jealous of the real Myatt or hate the ‘sinister Myatt’ conjured up by their imagination, with the ‘real’ Myatt having been described as “having fluency in the classical languages (Greek and Latin), as well as Arabic and possibly Persian, [and] possessed of a gifted intellect and apparently a polymath,” {2} and as “an extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual,” {3} and with the ‘sinister’ Myatt being accused by demonizers of all manner of crimes even though no evidence is ever provided to substantiate their accusations. {4}

        In the matter of individuals associating themselves with the O9A, their intent seems clear. It is to portray Myatt – aka Anton Long – in the most sinister light possible given that such individuals assert that the O9A is Satanist and indeed the only modern genuinely antinomian and satanist group because it espouses and practices what is evil such as criminality, violence, hatred, human sacrifice, political extremism, drug-trafficking and terrorism. Hence their composition and circulation of texts such as Bealuwes Gast {5} and Diablerie {6} and hence their assertion that Myatt is central to the O9A with his weird life an example of what it means to follow the O9A Seven Fold Way.

In the matter of individuals who are followers of Jesus – or at least sympathetic to the Christian religion – their intent also seems clear. It is to portray Myatt as an example, par excellence, of either a nihilistic modernism or of what a servant of Satan is and does in the real world, with one for instance recently writing that

“it is clear from my reading of O9A material that it is essentially not about the promethean elevation of the human person or individuality at all, which its talk of individuation and so on might seem to imply at first sight, but that the entire ‘philosophical’ system is geared towards the cunning seduction of human individuals in order to have them possessed and effectively taken over by these demonic entities (‘dark gods’), whose agenda is the source of this magical covenant itself, rather than David Myatt as an individualistic ‘philosopher’ with a personal agenda. Much of the teaching as presented exoterically to non-initiates is thus no more than upaya or ‘skilful means’ (if I’m permitted to appropriate the Buddhist term) to get people hooked so that the demons will have their incarnate vehicles to exploit. Some of the O9A fiction outlines very explicitly how it is a matter of a demonic infection being spread through the empowered transmission from a possessed initiate to another human vessel. The terrible truth is that the ‘new, more evolved individual’ is nothing more than a puppet of these satanic beings.”


A Common Theme

All such attempts to demonize Myatt have one thing in common. They all ignore important aspects of Myatt’s life and a swathe of his writings.

The ignored aspects of his life include his public (post 2010) rejection of all extremism (including neo-nazi and fascist ideology) while his ignored writings include his poetry, his published letters, his post 2011 writings about extremism, his writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos with its principles of empathy, humility, and compassion, his 2013 autobiography Myngath; his post 2012 autobiographical essays included in books such as Sarigthersa and One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods {7} and his essays praising Christianity and in particular Catholicism. {8}

The demonizers of Myatt have ignored such things because those things reveal a very different Myatt. One at odds with the ‘sinister’ image of him they have all in their own way strived to manufacture and have propagated in pursuit of their aims. For the image of Myatt that emerges from his poetry and his post 2011 writings is of a reclusive man who regrets his extremist past, who values virtues such as empathy and compassion, and who believes that

“the most important truth concerning human life […] is that a shared, a loyal, love between two people is the most beautiful, the most numinous, the most valuable thing of all.”

Naturally, one or two demonizers have tried to ‘square the circle’ here by claiming that Myatt’s rejection of extremism is a ruse and that the aforementioned writings of his were either written by someone else or were a clever ‘sinister’ jape by Myatt in order to mislead people.

Such claims are of course both laughable and revealing of the need such demonizers have of their ‘sinister Myatt’. That some of these demonizers have resorted to forgeries which they claim were written by Myatt while others have attached Myatt’s name to old or photocopied O9A typewritten articles, {9} shows the lengths they will go to propagandise their ‘sinister Myatt’ and to support their claim that Myatt is after all Anton Long.

As noted in an essay by Ms J. Wright, Myatt’s later writings

“express is a mysticism, a reverence for and an appreciation of the numinous, so at odds with the ethos and the practice of Satanism – of whatever variety – that it is inconceivable that they were written by a Satanist or even by a practising Occultist.” {10}

Rachael Stirling
March 2017


{1} According to an academic source Myatt is “arguably England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution.” Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (USAF), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.

{2} Connell Monette. Mysticism in the 21st Century, Sirius Academic Press, 2013. pp. 85-122.

{3} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014, pp. 529-533

{4} Some of the silly internet accusations made about Myatt from 2008 onwards relate to “gangstalking”, hacking into various internet forums, stealing people’s ID’s by hacking their computers, attacking disabled people, and that he was a police informer.

{5} Regarding the forgery titled Bealuwes Gast see the article Bealuwes Gast: A Study in Forgery.

{6} Regarding the forgery titled Diablerie see the article A Skeptic Reviews Diablerie.

{7} All these writings, and the poetry, are available from Myatt’s blog Learning From Adversity; A Rejection of Extremism.

{8} For instance see A Catholic Still In Spirit?

{9} Several people have claimed that they have or they have seen old typewritten O9A articles or letters or manuscripts signed with Myatt’s name. Yet as noted in O9A Questions And Answers 2017 (pdf) in response to one such claim:

“a signature on some old ONA typewritten MSS proves nothing. Anyone could have affixed Myatt’s name on them at any time and until the original documents are made available and examined in a forensic way by a professional qualified to do so then it’s just speculation; just another rumor about Myatt. A forensic examination would involve, among other things, finding the age of the paper, the type of ink used in the signature, comparing the signature with a documented signature by Myatt.”

{10} The Strange Life Of David Myatt (pdf).

Words Of A Modern Mystic

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David Myatt

David Myatt

Memories Of Manual Labour

Recalling happy memories of past years is perhaps a useful therapy during those seemingly long night hours when one is confined, in a foreign land, to a hospital bed and cannot, for a variety of reasons, enjoy the peace of sleep. During two such occasions, not that long ago, I found myself dwelling on my years of outdoor manual labour; on some four decades of cycling English lanes, tracks, and roads; and on the years spent running in the hills of South Shropshire and in places such as the Lake District.

In retrospection, this dwelling on such times quite surprised me, given my past married lives, my past predilection for the company of women, and the very many times I had been subsumed with love, or a passion, for a particular lady and had enjoyed with and because of them nights, days, weeks, sometimes months, of blissful happiness. Perhaps, I wondered, such a dwelling during such conditions revealed something about my character. Of how I am an outdoor, country, person by nature who by choice would choose to work alone; and someone perhaps too selfish, and too self-absorbed, to be a happily married man.

Suffice to write, now, that the memories that brought the most inner peace were those connected with outdoor work. Of those Summer days in Shropshire when – in the large garden of my employer – we would all sit down to enjoy our outdoor lunch prepared by his wife. Of days spent, over a decade later, on a farm in warm or hotful Sun, alone in a twenty-five or thirty acre field, forcing bamboo canes – many six feet in length – by hand into often hard ground next to recently budded trees planted in rows.

Of the dry dusty days of laying irrigation pipes and setting up the ‘rain gun’ sprinkler system with its large hose reel, enjoyed especially when the pump was the old Ford tractor with water drawn from the nearby river home to Kingfishers and bounded by many weeping Willow trees. Of, in early Spring, those cold days when the few of us out in the fields would sit around an open fire to eat our lunch.

Of those six straight weeks worked without a day off one Spring when, delayed by bad weather, we were finally able to prepare the soil and plant. Of those flash floods that flooded the lane beside one of the fields of the farm and of the car that became stuck, requiring two of us to bodily lift the lady driver out and carry her to dry land to later on fetch the tractor and tow her car from that lane back to the unaffected main road. Of the days spent one Autumn using a hand-held ‘thumper’ to erect new fence posts.

Of the hours, the days, the weeks, spent alone in fields hoeing the weeds out by hand from between the planted trees with my 1950s hoe whose long hickory handle years of use had made smooth. Of – years before, on another farm – the restful needful lunch (washed down by local cider) that followed hours of mucking-out pig sties by hand using a shovel and a barrow wheeled up a plank onto a trailer, hitched to a tractor, which when full I drove away then tipped to form or join another pile ready for the muck-spreader…

Had I then – during those years – the understanding and the self-insight I believe I now posses perhaps my life would, could, should, have been quite different and I would not have caused the suffering, and the deaths, that I caused. But was that person, so happily working in such places, the real me?

Yes, I do feel so, now. How then – why then – did I always seem to (after months, a year, or several years) drift away from such work back to occupy, preoccupy, myself with some political or some religious machination? It is just too easy, too trite, to say or write that I was a ‘complicated’ person. More truthfully, I was flawed, unhealthy. Suffering from extremism: for that infection wrought an inner dissatisfaction, and so greatly disturbed my psyche that I felt I had ‘a duty’ to do, and pontificate about, certain things. For that infection caused me, as so many others, to have that hubriatic certainty-of-knowing that engenders violence, hatred, terror, and oppression. I, as so many, had exchanged that real outdoor world – which centuries of toil had created – for some idealistic, ideological, dream we carried around in our head:

We are the hollow men
We are the stuffed men
Leaning together
Headpiece filled with straw

Our land, the dead land, while we extremists wreck havoc among the living land that provides us with the means to live and which, were we only to know it, nurtures the numinous from whence derives the culture that keeps our human hopes, our very humanity, alive.

For me – as for many others century following century – pathei-mathos was a cure. Yet there is not, and cannot be, any absolution: I was an ideologue, a leader, a fanatic, who enthusiastically taught, proselytized, persuaded, propagandised, and incited. Thus I alone was responsible for what I said, what I wrote, and what I did – for the suffering caused – during my extremist decades, just as I alone was responsible for the hurt my selfishness, my self-absorption, personally caused to others: wives, lovers, partners, family, relatives, and friends.

There appears to be, however, one small consolation, at least for me. Which is that such outdoor work – and reflexion upon it – slowly provided, slowly built within me, the insights and the feelings that led to that ‘numinous way’ I refined, after 2011, into my philosophy (or perhaps more correctly, into my weltanschauung) of pathei-mathos. Insights and feelings greatly added to in 2002 when I began work on another farm, and which work first led me to seriously doubt my commitment to the Muslim way of life, and write letters containing words such as these:

“There is a lovely, simple, pleasure here in this field. Spring is most certainly here: in the meadow fields, seedlings of the late Spring flowers push up through the tufts of grass whose frost-bitten ends are joined by shoots of new growth. Already some flowers bloom in the grass: there, a Dandelion; there: almost two circles of Daisies. And, to compliment the calls and songs of other birds, the loud repeating call of the Parus major.

It is good to be here, with an unobstructed view of the sky, and I watch the clouds, borne as they are on a still cool breeze that begins to chill my hands, a little. But there is Sun, warm, when the altocumulus breaks. On the horizon in the North, beyond the tall old Oak, small Cumulus clouds drift toward the hills, ten miles distant. Thus am I again – for these moments – at peace with myself, this world, listening as I do to a large flock of Starlings who chatter among themselves in the trees across from the drainage ditch, there by the copse of Ash, Oak, and a few young Beech […]

Work, yes there must be work: toil enough to keep that balance. And work with these my hands, outdoors where lives the silence that I love as I feel the weather, changing, bringing thus an empathic living for me, in me, and for this life that lives around, emanating as it does in this grass, those trees, the clouds, the soil, the water, those flowers, the very sky itself.”

But, as so often with me, the insights, the feelings, were swept away by not only my tempestuous inner need to do what I considered was then my duty but also by a life-long love of, a desire for, challenges, pontification, and conflict. Such insights, such feelings, were always – sooner or later – so swept away. Until that fateful day one May.

“The defining moment, for me – in terms of understanding myself, in terms of understanding politics and the error of my decades of extremism – was the tragic personal loss of a loved one in May 2006. In the hours following that event I just knew – tearfully knew without words – my own pathetic failure; what I had lost, what was important. Thus there came upon me that day a sense of overwhelming grief, compounded by a remembrance of another personal loss of a loved one thirteen years earlier. For it was as if in those intervening years I had learned nothing; as if I had made the life and the dying and death of Sue, in 1993 – and of what we shared in the years before – unimportant.

I have no words to describe how insignificant, how worthless, I felt that day in May 2006; no words to describe, recall, retell, the remorse, the pain. Suffice now to recount that my life was never, could never be, the same again. Gone – the arrogance that had sustained me for so many experiential decades. Gone – the beliefs, the abstractions, the extremisms, I had so cherished and so believed in.” No Words Of Mine Can Describe The Remorse

How stupid, how very stupid, I have been: for almost all of my adult life. That it required the shock, the personal trauma, of the suicide of the woman I loved to break my arrogance, my selfishness, my self-absorption – and cure me of my need for challenges, pontification, and conflict – most certainly reveals a lot about my character. That apparently jumelle nature of a person who found peace, contentment, in working outdoors with his hands but who also could not, in his weakness, resist that arrogant desire to zealously interfere in the lives of others, to propagandise and proselytize; an interference, a proselytism, born of a hubriatic certainty that he ‘knew’, that he ‘understood’, or that he had discovered the right way (political or religious) of living for others, and therefore had some sort of duty to act, wrecking havoc and causing suffering as he did so, always making excuses for himself. For every and any cause does so hallow havoc.

See with what heat these dogs of Hell advance
To waste and havoc yonder World, which I
So fair and good created, and had still
Kept in that state, had not the folly of Man
Let in these wasteful furies [1]

David Myatt
February 2014

[1] Paradise Lost, Book X, vv. 617-620

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Article source:
David Myatt. Sarigthersa: Some Recent Essays. 2015. ISBN 978-1512137149

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Decoding The Life Of Myatt

David Myatt

David Myatt

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Decoding The Life Of Myatt

One of the most common assumptions made about David Myatt – often made and repeated by anonymous persons by means of the internet – is that he has flitted from one cause to another, from one extreme (neo-nazi) to another extreme (radical Islam) and from one religion to another (Catholicism, Buddhism, Islam, Paganism) to end up founding “his own religion”, The Numinous Way.

That those making and repeating such an assumption are ill-informed and/or ignorant, with the assumption itself being prejudicial, is obvious if one studies the life of Myatt in detail.

The first relevant fact is that Myatt was a dedicated National Socialist activist and ideologue for thirty years (1968-1998). That is, for the major part of his adult life, and for a period most probably longer than many of his ‘anonymous internet detractors’ have been alive. This three decade long period of his life led to him being described as “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution.” {1}

The second relevant fact is that Myatt was a proponent of radical Islam – of Jihad – for ten years (1998-2008) during which decade he spent at least half of it in a campaign to form an alliance between National Socialists and Jihadists {2} so that they could fight what he regarded as their common enemy: Zionists and the Zionist entity that currently occupies Palestine. His campaign led to him being described as “emblematic of the modern syncretism of radical ideologies” {3} and as an “example of the axis between right-wing extremists and Islamists.” {2}{4} At a NATO conference in 2005 it was stated that Myatt, as a Muslim, had called on “all enemies of the Zionists to embrace the Jihad” against Jews and the United States {5}.

The third relevant fact – derived from the previous two – is that Myatt thus spent forty years of his life (1968-2008) actively campaigning against “the same enemy”, namely Jews and Zionists; that is, against what neo-nazis and others have termed ZOG, the Zionist Occupation Government.

Spending forty years of one’s life actively engaged in fighting the same enemy is most certainly not “flitting from one cause to another, from one extreme to another.”

Which decades-long dedication to a particular cause led to one academic writing that

“Even more astonishing than this transition [from neo-nazi to Muslim], is that it seems both his Nazism and Islamism are merely instruments for the ONA’s [Order of Nine Angles] underlying sinister esoteric plots.” {6}

Which brings us to consideration of Myatt’s possible motives; of what his five decades of peregrinations – from 1968 to 2018 – were all about.

The Peregrinations Of Mr Myatt

Myatt’s admittedly strange life has led to speculation about his intent, with one academic – reviewing the book in which the “underlying sinister esoteric plots” quotation occurs – describing Myatt as an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual.” {7}

Over the past ten years the speculation has ranged from (i) the aforementioned “instruments for the ONA’s underlying sinister esoteric plots,” to suggestions that (ii) he is a government agent provocateur, to (iii) him being on a life-long personal Faustian quest perhaps in hope of discovering ‘truth’, to (iv) him as a youthful fanatic who slowly, gradually, over decades learns from his experiences – political, religious, and personal – and thus changing, evolving, as a person.

In the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation he is “Anton Long”, founder of the Occult group the Order of Nine Angles, with his role being “paramount to the whole creation and existence of the ONA” {8} and with his life being regarded by many involved in the Occult sub-culture that is the ONA/O9A {9} as a documented example of the ONA’s Seven Fold Way {10}. Thus, “Myatt’s life-long devotion to various extreme ideologies has been part of a sinister game that is at the heart of the ONA.” {11}

In regard to the “government agent provocateur” interpretation, as Canadian author and satirist Jeff Wells wrote:

“Is Myatt an agent provocateur, a shit-disturber who can’t settle upon a radical philosophy, something more, or something less? It’s difficult to assess motive, but consider that he has been arrested numerous times for such things as writing and disseminating “practical terrorist guides” [and] on suspicion of conspiracy to murder. These cases have always been dropped due to “lack of evidence.” Does he enjoy protection? The record is suggestive that he does. And if it appears so, then we should ask the next question: Why?

Myatt may seem to have flitted from one politico-religious philosophy to another, but there is a terrible thread of continuity and rigour through his life and writings that suggests he is much more than a disingenuous provocateur. Naziism and Islamicism have served, in turn, as modalities of disruption for what remains at core an occult working to sow general chaos and division – the necessary passage of “Helter Skelter” to break down the Old Order, before the founding of the New.

So again: whose interests are served by there being a David Myatt? Is he is own man – or men – or does he belong to someone else? Or is it something else – an intelligence service perhaps.” {12}

As one proponent of this interpretation suggested, the O9A

“may well have been created by a state asset as a means of gathering intelligence and recruiting suitable individuals to undertake acts of subversion, extremism, and terrorism, under the pretext of occult training.” {13}

In the “Faustian quest” interpretation, Myatt – according to one academic, undertook

“a global odyssey which took him on extended stays in the Middle East and East Asia, accompanied by studies of religions ranging from Christianity to Islam in the Western tradition and Taoism and Buddhism in the Eastern path. In the course of this Siddhartha-like search for truth, Myatt sampled the life of the monastery in both its Christian and Buddhist forms.” {14}

In the “youthful fanatic who slowly over decades changes” interpretation, Myatt was an arrogant idealist who selfishly placed some cause before family and loved ones but whose varied experiences over decades gradually changed him, with there being no “Siddhartha-like search for truth” and no “underlying sinister esoteric plots”. Instead, as he wrote in his autobiography Myngath,

“As often in my life, it seemed as if the Fates revealed to me the direction in which I should go. Thus, and yet again, there was a certain period of drifting, by me, until a particular course of life seemed obvious, even to me.” {15}

Conclusion

The fact that Myatt’s life – as currently documented – is open to various interpretations is interesting, with it being for us to decide which interpretation to accept based on what level of knowledge of Myatt’s life and works we possess, on what aspect or aspects of his life and works we concentrate on, and – perhaps most important of all – on whether or not we already have a prejudicial opinion of the man.

At present, neither the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation nor the “government agent provocateur” interpretation are evidentially supported by primary sources relating to the life and writings of Myatt {16}{17}. Instead, they are based on non-evidential assumptions – often concerning Myatt’s intent – or, in case of academics and in the matter of the O9A, on fallacious reasoning as for example in the committal by Senholt of the Fallacy of Incomplete Evidence {18} and the committal of the fallacy of Illicit Transference by Massimo Introvigne {19} and by Della E. Campion. {20}

Since there is no scholarly biography of Myatt’s life based both on primary sources and on a detailed analyses of his post-2011 writings, his poetry, and his “philosophy of pathei-mathos” {21} the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation and the “government agent provocateur” interpretation constitute personal opinion and/or serve (i) as examples of a lack of scholarly research, (ii) as examples of the use of forgeries, such as Diablerie and Bealuwes Gast {22}, and (iii) as examples of fallacious reasoning.

My own detailed study of currently accessible primary sources – sources {17} essential to understanding Myatt’s life and to placing his extremist decades into perspective – inclines me to favour the “youthful fanatic who slowly over decades changes” interpretation.

For example, Myatt wrote in 2012 that

“what exposed my hubris – what for me broke down that certitude-of-knowing which extremism breeds and re-presents – was not something I did; not something I achieved; not something related to my character, my nature, at all. Instead, it was a gift offered to me by two others – the legacy left by their tragic early dying. That it took not one but two personal tragedies – some thirteen years apart – for me to accept and appreciate the gift of their love, their living, most surely reveals my failure, the hubris that for so long suffused me, and the strength and depth of my so lamentable extremism.” {23}

In a 2012 letter written to a BBC journalist and later included in his book Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination, {24} – both of which are primary sources – Myatt wrote,

“The problem in the past had been me, my lack of understanding of myself and my egoism. It was my fault: not the place, not the time, not the people, for I so desired with that arrogance of youth to exchange this paradise, here, for those ideas, the idealism, the abstractions, I carried around in my prideful hubriatic head. Seldom content, for long, since happiness came with – was – the pursuit, or the gratification of my personal desires. So destructive, so very destructive. So hurtful, inconsiderate, selfish, profane.”

In 2014 he wrote,

“In a very personal sense, my philosophy of pathei-mathos is expiative, as are my writings concerning extremism, such as my Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination published last year. Also expiative is my reclusiveness. But such things – as is only just and fitting – do little to offset the deep sadness felt, except in fleeting moments.” {25}

Such are the words, the feelings, of someone who as a result of pathei-mathos has been interiorly changed. Someone who – unusually, having spent forty years as a revolutionary activist, as “a theoretician of terror” {26} who was regarded as a “principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution” {1} – has moved from extremist to mystic. {27}

It is my conclusion that it is only those who have not studied or who are ignorant of currently accessible Myattian primary sources who can maintain that “Myatt flitted from one cause to another” or who can believe fallacious interpretations such as that involving “sinister esoteric plots”.

Morena Kapiris
May 2018 ev
v.1.02

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{1} Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (United States Air Force), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.

{2} Michael, George. The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, 2006. p. 142ff.

{3} Jon B. Perdue. The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71.

{4} Mark Weitzman. Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus, in Thomas Greven: Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte in der Ära der Globalisierung. 1 Auflage. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006

{5} Terrorism and Communications – Countering the Terrorist Information Cycle, Slovakia, April 2005. The document is available from the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism at http://www.ict.org.il/Article.aspx?ID=929 [accessed May 2018].

{6} Per Faxneld. Post-Satanism, Left Hand Paths, and Beyond in The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity, Oxford University Press (2012), p.207.

{7} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.

{8} Senholt, Jacob C. The Sinister Tradition. Conference paper presented at Satanism in the Modern World, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 19-20th of November, 2009. A copy is available at https://www.webcitation.org/6bpiHBIrr [accessed May 2018].

{9} Monette, Connell. Mysticism in the 21st Century. Sirius Academic Press. 2013, p.89.

{10} David Myatt, The Septenary Anados, And The Quest For Lapis Philosophicus, in A Modern Mysterium: The Enigma of Myatt And The O9A. e-text 2018. A gratis open access copy is available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/myattian-mysterium-v7.pdf [accessed May 2018].

{11} Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen (editors), The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012. p.269.

{12} Jeff Wells, Rigorous Intuition blog, August 2005.

{13} David Myatt: Agent Provocateur? e-text, 2009. Available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/agent-provocateur/ [accessed May 2018].

{14} Kaplan, Jeffrey. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. p. 216ff; p.512f

{15} Myatt, David. Myngath. Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life. CreateSpace, 2013. ISBN 9781484110744

{16} Primary sources in regard to Myatt’s life would include original documentation relating to his neo-nazi decades (such as criminal proceedings, police interviews), and documentation relating to his decade as a Muslim and his time as a Christian monk.

{17} Primary currently accessible sources regarding both his life and writings include the following post-2011 published works:

° The Numinous Way of Pathei-Mathos.
° Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination.
° Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos.
° Myngath.
° One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods.
° Sarigthersa.
° One Exquisite Silence: Some Autobiographical Poems.
° Such Respectful Wordful Offerings: Selected Essays Of David Myatt.

All the above works, and others, are available as gratis open access (pdf) documents from https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2018/03/09/david-myatt-opera-omnia/ [Accessed May 2018].

{18} Myatt, David. The Logical Fallacy of Incomplete Evidence – A Case Study, in A Matter Of Honour, 2013, e-text. Available at https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/about/a-matter-of-honour-2/ [accessed May 2018].

{19} Scott, Kerri. The Authority Of Individual Judgment And The Fallacy Of Illicit Transference, in The Peculiar Matter Of Myatt And Long, 2018, e-text. The essay is included in A Modern Mysterium, op.cit.

{20} Scott, Kerri. Another Academic Misinterpretation Of The O9A, 2018, e-text. Available at https://omega9alpha.wordpress.com/2018/04/24/another-academic-misinterpretation/ [accessed May 2018].

{21} An overview of his philosophy of pathei-mathos is given in J.R. Wright & R. Parker, The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt. CreateSpace, 2106. ISBN 978-1523930135.

{22} Myatt, in his A Matter Of Honour, op.cit., describes both those purported autobiographies of “Anton Long” as forgeries. See also (i) R. Parker, Bealuwes Gast: A Study in Forgery, 2014, e-text, available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/bealuwes-gast/ [Accessed May 2018] and (ii) R. Parker, A Skeptic Reviews Diablerie, 2013, e-text, available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/a-sceptics-review-of-diablerie/ [Accessed May 2018].

The thesis regarding Myatt being Anton Long proposed by academic Goodrick-Clark in his 2002 book Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity is based entirely on his assumption that Myatt wrote Diablerie. Goodrick-Clark provided no evidence from primary sources to support his assumption.

That Goodrick-Clark’s book has been cited by others – including some academics – as “proof” of Myatt being Anton Long is an example of those others committing the fallacy of Argumentum ad Verecundiam.

{23} Pathei-Mathos – Genesis of My Unknowing. 2012. The essay is included as an appendix in Myatt’s autobiography Myngath.

{24} Myatt, David. Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination. CreateSpace, 2013. ISBN ISBN 9781484854266.

{25} Myatt, David. Some Questions For DWM, included in One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods. CreateSpace, 2014. ISBN 978-1502396105.

{26} Theoretician of Terror, Searchlight, July 2000.

{27} J.R. Wright & R. Parker, op.cit.


Reading Myngath

David Myatt

David Myatt

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Reading Myngath
The Apologia of David Myatt

If the reader of Myngath expects a conventional autobiography then they will be either disappointed or consider the work somewhat bizarre.

Many – perhaps most – autobiographies appear to be consciously crafted in order to project, through the medium of words, a particular image of the author and an image which appears to be consistent because past events in the life of the author are often made to appear as if they were the genesis of, or support, what the authors want the reader to believe about who they are and why they have done what they have and/or now have the beliefs or the opinions that they do.

The lives, however, of most notable individuals are not so simple as many of them would like us – via such self-penned deliberate, cause-and-effect, narratives – to believe.

In the case of Myatt what we get is – as the sub-title of Myngath and the introductory brief Apologia inform us – “some recollections of a wyrdful and extremist life” which were a “concise aural recollection to a friend, recorded and then transcribed” and which conciseness was because, according to Myatt “it is the essence of this particular life, recalled, that in my fallible view is or rather may be instructive, and I have tried to present this essence in a truthful way and thus be honest about my failings, my mistakes, my past activities, and my feelings at the time.”

The important phrases here are “aural recollection”, “some recollections”, and “honest about my feelings at the time.” For Myngath is a brief explanation, hastily given to someone (and probably edited by Myatt before publication), of how Myatt himself felt at certain times of his life, how he believes he finally came to reject the extremism that dominated his adult life and develop his philosophy of pathei-mathos.

Which explanation is also an apology for both his extremist deeds and the selfishness so evident in his recollections of his private life. Which may explain why he chose a brief Apologia in preference to a lengthy Introduction; why he inserts some of his poems into the text, and why he added three appendices; with the poems for example expressing his feelings in a way that a wordy explanation might not.

What all this amounts to is that Myngath is not an ordinary autobiography but rather a series of impressions of Myatt at various times in his life. The enthusiastic unconventional schoolboy; a rather naive teenager getting involved in right-wing politics; the violent fanatic setting up a criminal gang to fund a political cause; the rather amoral convict running rackets from his prison cell; the selfish lover; the romantic dreamer and poet; the rather boyish somewhat mischievous Catholic monk; and the extremist turned humanist philosopher for whom “a shared, a loyal, love between two people is the most beautiful, the most numinous, the most valuable thing of all.”

The impression that emerges was succinctly expressed a few years ago by an academic: an impression of an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual.” {1}

Understood as a series of impressions of the life of an individual with rather interesting and diverse experiences – from childhood on – Myngath is a worthwhile read, if only because it places the opinions of so many others about Myatt, from anti-fascists to journalists to various academics, into perspective as being very simplistic. For such a complex man with such a diversity of experiences cannot be so easily pigeon-holed and as two-dimensional as they have made him and make him out to be.

Myngath was, for me, also somewhat annoying, in that beneficial way that annoyance can sometimes be, since it intrigued me sufficiently to read more of David Myatt’s later (post-2011) writings and left me wanting to find a well-researched, objective, and detailed biography of him. The writings were easy to find, but such a biography has yet to be written.

J.B.
July 2016
(Revised 2017)

Myngath is available
(i) as a pdf document from Myatt’s weblog: https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/myngath-2/
and (ii) as a printed book published in 2013, ISBN 978-1484110744

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{1} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.