Redefining Anti-Semitism

odal3

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Editorial Note: The following article about redefining anti-Semitism, written in 2018, we regard as notable given the intervention by the current Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis in the November/December 2019 UK election campaign and which intervention lambastes the Labour party for its “anti-Semitism” and seems to imply that “a Labour victory in that campaign would be a catastrophe”. {1}

In other words, British Jews should support the Conservatives leader Boris Johnson whose Jewish ancestry {2} has, apparently, never been mentioned by the mainstream Media during this 2019 UK election campaign.

Is this intervention by the current Chief Rabbi one more example of the “social engineering” mentioned in the following article?

We believe it is, and which “social engineering” Myatt – in an appendix to his Mythos of Vindex {3} – described as “the manipulation and control of people by abstract social/political ideas. Our modern lifeless, multi-racial societies are the direct product of decades of social engineering, of social/political ideas and abstract doctrines made law.”

The modern re-definition of so-called “anti-Semitism” certainly seems to be an “abstract social/political idea”.

RDM Crew
2019

{1} https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/26/british-jews-corbyn-emigrate
{2} https://wyrdsister.wordpress.com/2019/07/29/boris-johnson-his-jewish-credentials/
{3} https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2016/05/myatt-mythos-of-vindex-v1.pdf

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Redefining Anti-Semitism
A Tale For Our Times

The current political row about so-called “anti-Semitism” in the British Labour party is a relevant tale of our times for several reasons.

I. It is a relevant tale, firstly, because the term “anti-Semitism” is a fairly recent invention, dating from the 1870’s but only becoming common in English due to the anti-German propaganda that proliferated before and during the Second World War. {1} As defined in the Complete Oxford English Dictionary (Second edition, 1989) it means “hostility and prejudice directed against Jewish people, and the theory, action, or practice resulting from this.”

II. It is a relevant tale, secondly, because it reveals how influential and powerful certain Jewish advocacy groups are since they have for years lobbied the British government – and police forces and other official bodies – to accept the new definition of “anti-Semitism” invented by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA).

The IHRA’s definition is: “Antisemitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”

However, as well of this definition, the IHRA helpfully provide examples of what according to their definition constitute the “crime” of “anti-Semitism”. Among their examples are the following:

° Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust.

° Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations.

° Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour.

° Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.

Since this IHRA definition – and its examples – define things which it advocates and supporters consider to be “wrong”, morally reprehensible, it should be obvious that it enshrines an ideology; that is, it is a scheme of ideas relating to ethics, politics and society, and forms the basis of action and policy.

Furthermore, since this ideology, enshrined in the IHRA definition and its examples, is now increasingly being used by police forces, councils, and other official bodies, to determine if a “hate crime” has been committed, it is clear that there is a movement, not yet written in law but continually agitated for, to make things such as a “certain perception of Jews”, “holocaust denial” and criticism of Zionists and of the Zionist entity itself, punishable crimes in the modern West.

That this ideology – whose advocates and supporters seek to criminalise “a certain perception” that some other people do not like or approve of – is an assault on freedom of expression and freedom of belief should be obvious. That this assault is still not obvious to many is tribute to just how effective the propaganda of the Zionist lobbies and of “holocaust remembrance” lobbies is and has been, for such propaganda – repeated almost every day, every week, every year, since 1945 – is that “anti-Semitism led to the horrors, the inhumanity, of the holocaust and such horrors must never be allowed to happen again.”

Yet if – as those who write and speak in favour of historical revisionism claim and believe – the holocaust did not happen as portrayed in the holocaust literature then persecuting and criminalizing those who question or doubt it is repressive and intolerant. This intolerance was summed up following the criminal conviction in May 2018 in a British court of law of a singer – Alison Chabloz – just for singing songs questioning the veracity of the holocaust, with the leader of the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism declaring that “in Britain Holocaust denial […] will not be tolerated.”

In other words, advocates and supporters of a particular ideology demand that their zealous intolerance becomes official policy and is enshrined in the law of the land, just as they rejoice when someone is convicted in a court of law on the basis of the intolerant ideology they advocate and support.

It really does seem as if we in the West have not learned much from the religious intolerance of former centuries when those who did not believe in certain things – and who perhaps had “a certain perception” that differed from what was then the accepted, the non-heretical, norm – were persecuted and criminalized.

III. It is a relevant tale, thirdly, because it reveals just how intertwined the modern legend of the holocaust is (i) with re-defining “anti-Semitism”, (ii) with intolerant attempts to criminalize “a certain perception”, (iii) with support for and the survival of the Zionist entity that currently occupies Palestine, and (iv) with the religious belief that the Jews were and are the “chosen people of God” and that therefore they have a God-given right and duty to create and then to live in the Zionist entity. Hence, of course, the Zionist “law of return”.

For without the legend of the holocaust the Zionist entity would either not exist or would not be supported as it is and has been – economically, financially, militarily, propagandistically and otherwise – by the wealthy nations of the modern West.

It should therefore come as no surprise that, in an unguarded moment, the then Chief Rabbi of the United Kingdom, Dr. Jakobovits, declared in 1982 that “The Jews were chosen to act as pathfinders for the world, and Israel has a special place as an instrument to effect the Jew’s social engineering upon the world.” {2}

Where by the term “social engineering” he meant and implied both (i) government and State efforts (through laws, propaganda and other means) to influence the attitudes and ideas of people and the structure of society, and (ii) efforts by the Media and special interest groups to bring about certain changes in society.

For re-defining the term “anti-Semitism”, criminalizing questioning or doubting the legend of the holocaust, and – among things – demanding that a certain ideology becomes official policy and is enshrined in the law of the land, most certainly amounts to social engineering.

Haereticus
23 July 2018 ev

{1} An example of such propaganda occurred in The Economist magazine dated 24th August 1935: “The Nazi Party stalwarts […] have all been leading an anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic, anti-Protestant crusade.”

{2} The Guardian newspaper (London), 7th August 1982.

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Hypocrisy, Politicians, And Probative Value

odal3

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Amesbury Incident Update
Hypocrisy, Politicians, And Probative Value

 

Hypocrisy And Politicians

As predicted by the sagacious – by those whose guides are reason, fairness, and evidence which has probative value – the death of the woman involved in the Amesbury incident has led to politicians and others to express hypocritical outrage. Thus the British Prime Minister said she was “appalled and shocked by the death.”

Why is such outrage hypocritical? Because there is a political agenda behind it and because it ignores the fact that on average, around 3 women a day are killed in Britain {1} while between 2009 and 2015, 936 women were killed by men they knew {2} and which number of murders is far more than those who in Britain lost their lives due to acts of terrorism during the same period.

Did the current Prime Minister and former Prime Ministers publicly state that they were “appalled and shocked” by the death of each of those women? Did they send their “thoughts and condolences” to the families of each victim? Did they state that their government was “committed to providing full support to the local community” as it dealt with each such tragedy? No of course not.

Did the local police involved in such murders, as is now the case with Amesbury incident, have a squad of over 100 detectives from outside their area assist them? No of course not.

Why not? Because such deaths did not serve the political agendas of the government of the day while the death of the woman in the Amesbury incident does serve the political agenda of the government of the day. To wit, their propaganda campaign against Russia and especially against Vladimir Putin.

Probative Value

As also predicted by the sagacious, the British Home Secretary – following the death of the woman involved in the Amesbury incident – propagandistically stated, without providing or citing any evidence, that “we know back in March that it was the Russians. We know it was a barbaric, inhuman act by the Russian state.”

We are thus entitled to ask obvious questions such as: “Where is the evidence for such accusations? Where is or was it published and made available to we the people?” Available to we the people – the supposed basis for their government – so that we may make our own, individual, and informed, opinion based on evidence which has probative value.

Until there is such publicly available evidence “we the people” are supposed to trust the politicians who make such accusations, and – when pressed on the matter of evidence (as they seldom if ever are by journalists) – are supposed to trust their vague statements about “intelligence” gathered by the security services “proving” such accusations, although such “intelligence” is never published at the time and when on the few occasions that it is (years later after its propaganda value is no longer relevant) it is often “redacted” and as in the case of purported Iraqi weapons of mass destruction often shown to be false and propagandistic.

Thus instead of treating “we the people” with respect, as intelligent beings, modern politicians of modern democracies condescendingly expect us to trust them, believe their propaganda, and ignore their utter hypocrisy.

For such politicians, the death of one women in one incident provides them with political opportunities, while the murder of thousands of other women – often in more barbaric circumstances – is not even a footnote in the history of modern British democracy.

Is such modern democracy still fit for purpose? Or does it, as we are inclined to believe, need reforming, so that in the words of one perspicacious commentator,

                  “leaders and politicians must have such personal character-revealing experience as qualifies them to lead and to govern, with that personal experience consisting of proven and years-long ‘front line’ service to their country and to their people such as in the armed forces or serving as a ‘first responder’ in such occupations as paramedic, a police officer, and in the Fire & Rescue service.” {3}

Three Wyrd Sisters
9th July 2018 ev

{1} The Guardian, One woman dead every three days, 14 December 2017.

{2} Helen Pidd, The Guardian, 7 December 2016.

{3} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2010/05/29/the-moment-of-my-reading/

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Related:
https://wyrdsister.wordpress.com/2018/07/04/the-amesbury-incident/


Article source: https://wyrdsister.wordpress.com/2018/07/09/amesbury-incident-update/


Some Problems With Modern Democracy

David Myatt

Editorial Note: Although this 2010 essay by Myatt pre-dates his philosophy of pathei mathos and may therefore fall into the category of writings disowned by him, we republish it here as in our view it offers some interesting insights into modern democracy.

RDM Crew
May 2018 ev

Article source: https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2010/05/29/the-moment-of-my-reading/

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A Moment Among My Reading

Some Problems With Modern Democracy

For the past few weeks I have been re-reading classical authors such as Thucydides, Herodotus, Pliny, and Tacitus. Which reading led to me to reflect upon the histories of the nations of the modern West and the form of government – the modern democracy – that they have developed and whether such problems as I, personally, perceive that such a form of government has may be detrimental to Western societies in the future.

Some Basic Problems

1. The first problem I perceive with modern democracy is that a country generally gets the leaders – presidents, prime ministers – and the government who and which tend to reflect, in their words, promises, and policies, the often changeable fears, hopes, and emotions of a majority of people at election time or at least of the percentage necessary to win an election; with such fears, hopes, and emotions often engendered by the Media, by a specific political party, by a ‘social movement’, and by ‘special interest’ (advocacy) groups or individuals with their own agendas, all of whom seek to influence ‘public opinion’ and the policies of politicians and governments. Such ‘special interest’ groups invariably include those with particular business and political concerns who have the financial resources to employ professional lobbyists, Media consultants, and propagandists.

The result is that the political party and/or particular advocacy groups who have the most money during elections campaigns, and who have the support of a substantial part of the Media, and/or who have a candidate for high office who is a persuasive public speaker, influence the result of elections, having persuaded or influenced the percentage of people necessary to win an election.

In other words, modern elections have become an often cynical process of targeting, persuading, and influencing, people (or specific types of people) by appealing to their fears, their hopes, their emotions, based on specific – and supra-personal – political, social, and business, agendas and interests.

In practical terms this means that the leaders tend to represent their own personal (sometimes emotive) and/or political agenda and/or the agendas of whatever ‘special interest’ groups have helped them get elected. Naturally they deny this, since they invariably and cynically declare that their policies and actions represent “the will of the people” – and thus that they have a mandate for those policies and actions – or they rather naively do believe that they have a mandate having a personality or the personal vanity which has made them a mere figurehead for ‘special interest’ groups and/or the political magnates of their own political party who themselves have their own agendas.

Over decades, the cynical process of targeting, persuading, and influencing, people results in changing governments, for with each new election a majority of people are persuaded or believe that “it will be better, different, next time” and that their hopes will be realized by electing a different president or a different political party or even by electing the same political party but with a different prime minister and some different politicians. Meanwhile, very little of substance changes for the majority. There may be some cosmetic changes, but public services often get worse, crime increases, with the poor staying poor, and the rich staying rich or becoming richer, immune or indifferent as the majority of the rich are to declining public services, to social problems, and to increasing crime.

2. The second problem with modern democracy is that politicians in general and candidates for leadership positions in government do not have to have – and in these modern times are not expected by the public to have – practical character-revealing life-experiences; and thus to have undertaken deeds which have revealed that they are courageous individuals who in dangerous or difficult situations have placed the life of others and of their country before their own. Life-experience such as serving in the armed forces of one’s country and being awarded a medal or medals for gallantry; or serving as a ‘first responder’ – such as a paramedic, or a police officer, or in the Fire & Rescue service – and thus having faced difficult, trying, and life-threatening circumstances.

Instead, all individuals have to do to qualify as a politician is to have powerful and influential friends, and/or have the support of a substantial part of the Media, and/or have the support of influential advocacy groups, and/or have adroitly played ‘the political game’ and thus have been selected by the political magnates of their own political party, and/or have personal wealth sufficient to buy their way into the Media or – through (sometimes secret) donations or other means – gain the support of influential advocacy groups.

The result is that in a modern democracy there is a leader, and a government composed of a majority of politicians, who have no courageous deeds to their name, who have no experience of ‘front line’ service to their country and to their people, but who send people to fight wars, who make and enforce policy for the ‘front line’ services of their own land, and who can and who do, and based on some supra-personal political agenda, impose sanctions on other countries and who thus cause suffering to the ordinary people of those other countries.

In other words, you have career politicians who have never proved their mettle – never been tested – in dangerous or difficult situations lauding it over those who have.

3. The third problem with modern democracy is that modern politicians – with only a few exceptions – have mastered and use the art of propaganda, evident in their inability to be open and honest about their own failings and culpability while in public office, and in their inability to be honest about the failure of the policies of their government. Instead, they are adroit at manufacturing excuses, or shifting the blame away from themselves and government policies, or are disingenuous when answering questions or when addressing concerns about their culpability or that of their government.

4. The fourth problem with modern democracy is that, as a consequence of the aforementioned three problems, there is not “government by the people for the people” but instead government by a generally self-serving or advocacy-driven clique. Which political clique is generally wealthier – for politicians are paid well and often have other sources of income – than the majority of the electorate they were elected to serve.

Consequences

Since modern democracy is today still considered by the majority to function reasonably well in terms of maintaining society, it will remain for that majority the only viable option. For its inherent cynical process of targeting, persuading, and influencing, people will work so long as a majority can be persuaded that, after the next election, “it will be better, different,” with the self-serving or advocacy-driven political clique well-understanding the Psychologie des Foules.

Thus, the always well-off political clique will continue to laud it over the poor and those whose ‘front-line’ public service keeps society functioning. The self-perpetuating political clique will continue to makes excuses for their own failures, for declining public services, for government failure to solve social problems, and for increasing poverty, homelessness, and crime.

Mass discontent, as for example in the anti-war protests before and after the invasion of Iraq, strikes, scandals about corrupt politicians, even occasional riots, have not impacted significantly on the self-perpetuating political cliques: a change of leadership, some new policies, the dismissal or the resignation of a few politicians, propaganda by the Media, perhaps the election of a new government, are usually all that is required to maintain the democratic ‘status quo’.

A study of history, ancient and modern, indicates – at least to me – that such manipulation of the many by the few for the benefit of the few cannot, given human nature en masse, continue indefinitely. That there may well arise such a breakdown of basic services, such perceived inequality, such perceived injustices, such widespread discontent, that revolution, somewhere – peaceful or otherwise – seems almost inevitable, with the attendant suffering that revolutions often cause. Thus will the cyclical nature of human history repeat itself, for we humans apparently have not changed, en masse, significantly enough so that we are personally guided by such virtues as honesty, reason, and εὐταξία to thus be immune to the propagandistic machinations of politicians, demagogues, ideologues, and special interest groups. Instead, it seems that the same fears, hopes, and emotions, still guide us, just as the negative traits of old seem to still guide so many of those few who have, by whatever means, acquired power and authority over the majority.

Can this apparently inevitable suffering-causing cyclicity – such as that of governing cliques and their overthrow, and of the decline of societies – be avoided? My own personal – and admittedly fallible – answer is to reform modern democracy so that leaders and politicians must have such personal character-revealing experience as qualifies them to lead and to govern, with that personal experience consisting of proven and years-long ‘front line’ service to their country and to their people such as in the armed forces or serving as a ‘first responder’ in such occupations as paramedic, a police officer, and in the Fire & Rescue service.

However, such a reform by having character-revealing experience as a qualification for political office is unlikely to occur, given vested interests and – dare I say it – an education system which has neglected study in their original language of authors such as Thucydides, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristotle, Pliny, Tacitus, and Cicero.

So many times, in the past somewhat turbulent decade of my life, I have reflected upon a particular verse by Sophocles:

πολλὰ τὰ δεινὰ κοὐδὲν ἀνθρώπου δεινότερον πέλει [1]

For this seems to me to capture something of our rather strange human nature – of our ability, our potential, our capacity, to be honourable, self-restrained, rational human beings, and our seemingly equal capacity (or often, greater capacity) to be unsympathetic, insensitive, selfish, dishonourable, untrustworthy, or just plain barbaric.

David Myatt
2010

[1] Antigone, 334. My translation: “There exists much that is strange, but nothing has more strangeness than we human beings.”