An Itinerant Jihadi

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Several pages of a new book – Itinerant Jihadis: Arab and Muslim War Volunteers by Raphael Israeli, published by Strategic Book Publishing & Rights Agency – are devoted to David Myatt and his Muslim years, with the author quoting from several articles written by Myatt.

While there is nothing new about Myatt – with the information somewhat dated, and the author covering previously well-described aspects of Myatt’s life from his leadership of the NSM to his publicly-given (rather propagandistic) reason for converting to Islam – the author does, however, write that Myatt et al provide “incriminating evidence of the brewing Islamic subversion in Britain, and elsewhere, and of its close relationship with world Jihadi organizations.”


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Anti-Islam Propaganda: An Illustrative Example

madina5

Anti-Islam Propaganda: An Illustrative Example
The Case of Bill Warner

For well over a decade an assortment of Western-based (and often well-funded) individuals and political groups have produced an immense amount of propaganda intended to discredit Islam. One of the most common traits shared by such English-speaking propagandists is that they, being unable to read Arabic, and having no academic expertise in relevant fields such as fiqh, use various published English interpretations of fundamental Islamic texts such as the Koran and Ahadith.

An illustrative example here is an American calling himself ‘Bill Warner’ – real name William French – who, although he cannot read Arabic and has no academic expertise in relevant fields such as fiqh, has published a number of books about ‘political Islam’, has established a so-called ‘Center for the Study of Political Islam‘, and whose books and ‘statistical analysis’ of texts such as the Koran have been trumpeted by various political groups and by individuals opposed, for whatever reason, to Islam. Both Warner himself – and those using his works for propaganda purposes – claim that his analysis of Islamic texts is “scientific”.

However, his analysis of Islamic texts is hardly scientific and most definitely unscholarly because he uses, not the actual Arabic texts (such as, in the case of the Koran, the Uthman codex), but rather the English “interpretations of meaning” published by others. In addition, he uses an English interpretation of the Koran – written in modern “newspaper style” English – that does not even follow the traditional (Arabic) arrangement of Quranic chapters (starting with Surah Al-Fatihah) but which instead places them into a particular conjectured “historical order” for which there is no scholarly consensus and no historical evidence. {1}

Thus, his much vaunted ‘statistical analysis’ is simply his personal opinion about the interpretations of someone else and has no scholarly (or even academic) value whatsoever given that Warner relies on secondary, and sometimes tertiary, not primary sources. For one of the attributes of modern scholars is that they have a detailed knowledge of primary sources acquired from reading such sources in their original language and thus do not rely on the translations or interpretations of others. One of the attributes of non-scholars in the milieu of academia and otherwise is that they base their writings on secondary sources and thus in the main just interpret or reinterpret the interpretations and conclusions of others. In the case of Islam, the primary texts – such as the Koran and Ahadith – are all in classical Arabic.

To give just one example, of literally thousands, of the folly of the English interpretation Warner/French used, the word “war” occurs in surah 9:29 as the “translation” for a certain Arabic word – transliterated qatilu – and which Arabic word, correctly understood in context, implies fight, struggle (against), oppose: فَقَاتِلُوا أَئِمَّةَ الْكُفْرِ إِنَّهُمْ لَا أَيْمَانَ لَهُمْ لَعَلَّهُمْ يَنْتَهُونَ

In respect of the matter of English interpretations of important texts such as the Koran there is an interesting essay by David Myatt (who actually can read Arabic), first published in 2012, and in which essay Myatt writes:

“The problem of sometimes projecting modern interpretations onto ancient texts by the injudicious use, in a translation, of a particular English word is especially relevant in the matter of the Quran, for it seems to be increasingly common for someone reliant on translations – on the interpretations of meaning given by others – to misunderstand the text of the Quran and then, from that misunderstanding, not only form a misconceived (and sometimes prejudiced) opinion about the Quran in particular and Islam in general but also to give voice to such an opinion.

For example, an ayah (verse) often (mis)quoted is Ayah 151 of Surah Al ‘Imran, which is usually interpreted as “Soon shall we cast terror into the hearts of the unbelievers.” However, the word ‘terror’ is an inappropriate interpretation for several reasons.” {2}

Myatt then quotes the Arabic of that verse in full and argues that the particular Arabic word in question does not imply ‘terror’ but rather “the fear/the dread and ‘the astonishment/awe’ – that is, that human feeling inspired by apprehending or experiencing some-thing supernaturally or extraordinarily powerful and numinous.” He then provides a comparison with a passage in Greek from the New Testament – Luke 24.37 – and goes on to provide his own quite poetic interpretation of meaning of the Arabic Ayah:

“Into the hearts of they who disbelieve We shall hurl redurre because they, without any authority revealed about such things, associate others with Allah; and for their home: The Fire, that harrowing resting place of the unjust.”

Myatt further writes that

“I have used the unusual English word redurre, with a meaning of ‘awe combined with a trembling fear’. A word suggested by its occurrence in religious works by Richard Rolle and John Gower, and also by texts such as Morte Arthure and which word therefore places this Ayah from the Quran into the correct context, which is that of a religious revelation, a spiritual message, comparable to that of Christianity, and of the particular ontology that Islam offers as answers to questions concerning the meaning and the purpose of our mortal lives; of how that purpose may be attained; and thus of what wisdom is. Answers which have nothing whatsoever to do with ‘terrorism’, or even with ‘terror’ as that word is now commonly understood.”

Myatt’s measured words and scholarship, evident in his post-2011 writings, place the works of the likes of Bill Warner into the correct perspective: as works of prejudiced propaganda.

JB & KS
2017

{1} Islamic scholars have argued – for over a millennia – about the chronological order of the Koran. All the scholars, however, agree that the traditional arrangement was inspired by the Prophet Muhammad himself and is thus how the Koran should be read and used, by Muslims, as a guide.

{2} Myatt, David: Exegesis and Translation: Some Personal Reflexions, 2012. Myatt included part of this essay as an appendix to his book Poemandres: A Translation of and Commentary on the Poemandres part of the Corpus Hermeticum. Third edition, 2014. ISBN 978-1495470684

Myatt’s 2012 essay is currently [January 2017] available in pdf format from his weblog: https://davidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/exegesis-and-translation-partsone-two.pdf

 


 

O9A: Praising Islam

Order of Nine Angles

O9A

Order of Nine Angles: Praising Islam
(pdf)


David Myatt: a Guía Nacionalsocialista para comprender el Islam

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Todos los textos aquí presentados fueron escritos originalmente por David Myatt, un antiguo teórico y activista Nacionalsocialista, con años de militancia en diversos grupos, afines al Hitlerismo Esotérico, el Nacionalsocialismo y el racialismo identitario blanco, de la talla de la Orden de los Nueve Ángulos, el Movimiento Nacional Socialista del Reino Unido, Reichsfolk y Combat 18, entre otros. David Myatt es uno de los teóricos contemporáneos más reconocidos del movimiento NS moderno, con una cantidad impresionante de textos sobre la materia, aunque actualmente es usado como referencia histórica, ya que en años recientes, Myatt abandonó y desconoció sus trabajos sobre el tema, apostando por una nueva filosofía personal que desarrolló bajo el nombre de “Filosofía de Pathei-Mathos”.

Cabe mencionar que David Myatt se alejó del espectro Nacionalsocialista y abrazó completamente el Islam en 1998, después de estudiarlo durante un tiempo y encontrar afinidades con la lucha NS contra el Marxismo, el Capitalismo y el Sionismo, y entender la Yihad práctica de los musulmanes como una de las muy pocas verdaderas acciones de activismo en el mundo contra estos males y sus patrocinadores, así como comprender que el Islam es una religión que ensalza el honor, la lealtad, la razón y el respeto, entre otras cosas, justo como lo hace la cosmovisión tradicional Nacionalsocialista, a la cual se había adherido durante décadas.

Puede decirse que Myatt es una pieza clave dentro de la doctrina NS dirigida a las generaciones post-NSDAP, pues sus obras escritas son muy bien recibidas en el mundo NS de habla inglesa. Además, también se considera que Myatt -o Abdul-Aziz Ibn Myatt, después de convertirse al Islam-, es quien más ha contribuido a crear una síntesis y un entendimiento entre quienes se dicen Nacionalsocialistas, y los musulmanes.

Al hacer una lectura biográfica de David Myatt, uno puede encontrar que no se trata del típico militante Nacionalsocialista, ni del típico teórico islámico. De hecho, algo de lo que más ha causado controversia en torno a la figura de Myatt, es que su “búsqueda por el sentido definitivo de la vida”, lo llevó a ser monje cristiano, budista, taoísta, pagano y finalmente musulmán, sin omitir su paso por el activismo pro-NS. Por ello, Myatt ha llegado a ser visto como alguien inestable, que fue “cambiando de bando” una y otra vez con el paso de los años, hasta llegar a ser, finalmente, una especie de pacifista, rechazador del “extremismo” y la violencia en cualquiera de sus formas, con su propia visión del mundo y de la vida.

Pero cabe aclarar, que Myatt terminó rechazando el aspecto racialista del Nacionalsocialismo y el “extremismo” del “Islam radical” sólo después de sufrir un grave shock que lo llevaría a “reevaluar” su vida y todo lo que había hecho durante ella.

Y es que la vida personal de David Myatt no fue nada fácil, y al menos en una ocasión anterior se supo de un shock emocional suyo: En 1990, cuando se acababa de mudar a Malvern, para vivir y trabajar, Myatt destruyó sus copias personales de la poesía que había escrito (Myatt también es poeta), calificándolos de “autoindulgentes y decadentes”, añadiendo que “la vida personal está muerta”, expresando finalmente, su deseo (que no cumplió) de no escribir poesía de nuevo.

Este episodio, de acuerdo con JR Wright -la biógrafa de Myatt-, pudo haber sido el resultado de la muerte de su segunda esposa, a causa del cáncer, cuando tenía sólo 39 años de edad, siendo su primer matrimonio un fracaso, después de que su pareja se fugara con una mujer más joven.

Sin embargo, el shock que en este caso nos interesa, y que llevó a este personaje a “reevaluar” su vida y alejarse del Islam definitivamente, fue el suicidio de su prometida Francine, en 2006.

David Myatt ha aceptado abiertamente que este suceso cambió radicalmente su concepción de la vida, llevándolo incluso a un punto muy fuerte de inestabilidad emocional. Por ejemplo, una de las primeras cosas que hizo Myatt, poco después del suicidio de su prometida, fue ir a la iglesia católica más cercana, a encender una vela -a su nombre- en la Capilla de la Virgen María, aun cuando sabía que seguía siendo musulmán y que lo esperado, era ir a una Mezquita o hacer una súplica a Allah.

Así, el suicidio de Francine, llevaría a nuestro personaje a una reflexión de aproximadamente 3 años, durante los cuales se seguiría mostrando como musulmán, aunque esto cambiaría en 2010, cuando Myatt anuncia haber abandonado el Islam, para centrarse exclusivamente en su personal “Filosofía de Pathei-Mathos”.

Si bien la vida de David Myatt dio giros radicales una y otra vez -sobre todo, por cuestiones profundamente emocionales y de gran impacto-, es de reconocer que sus obras, tanto en el ámbito Nacionalsocialista, como en el Islámico, son un referente de gran calidad para quienes desean conocer la más vasta teoría condensada entre el NS y el Islam, creada de la mano de quien fuera uno de los Nacionalsocialistas más importantes del Reino Unido, y después, uno de los musulmanes fundamentalistas más conocidos en el mundo occidental, no sólo por su defensa de la Yihad antisionista, sino por la magnificencia de su obra escrita, en apoyo a un Islam puro, el establecimiento de un Califato, y la gobernanza de la Shariah.

Nosotros rescatamos una pequeña parte de sus textos -ya escritos como musulmán y dirigidos para Nacionalsocialistas y afines- y los compartimos (aun sabiendo que el propio autor se deslinda actualmente de ellos, en pos de su inclinación pacifista) simplemente porque forman la mejor contribución en el tema que alguien haya podido dar jamás.

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Editorial Note: Myatt’s National-Socialist Guide To Islam is available as a pdf document here:  ns-guide-islam.pdf



With Reference To Islam

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Editorial Note:
Below is a link to a pdf version of David Myatt’s 2012 text In Explanation Of Humility and The Need for Tolerance: With Reference to Islam, which text – as he explains – is taken “from a reply sent, in November of 2012, to a personal correspondent living in America who enquired about my peregrinations among various religions; about why – as mentioned in previous correspondence – I still respected the Muslim way of life; and about my response to the particular criticism that Islam encourages terrorism.”

Four years on, the text is even more relevant given the continuing (sometimes violent) anti-Muslim sentiment that pervades certain sections of societies in Europe, Britain, and America. In 2013, Myatt would incorporate a revised version of parts of the text into the Questions of Good, Evil, Honour, and God section of his book Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos.

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David Myatt: Extremism, Terrorism, Culture, And Physis

Covert surveillance photograph of David Myatt by the BBC
Extremism, Terrorism, Culture, And Physis
  A Question Of Being

Disinclined as I am, and as I have been for many years, to comment on recent events, I have – after much reflexion – decided to respond to certain questions asked of me, given that several friends and diverse individuals (communicating through correspondence forwarded to me through intermediaries) have expressed an interest in my opinion about some recent events in France because of my forty years of (now regretted) practical experience of extremism [1] and extremists and which experience included not only being an advocate, as a Muslim, of what has become known as ‘Islamic extremism’, but also of being a neo-nazi activist and ideologue who preached and who advocated subversion, insurrection, hatred, and terrorism.

The recent events in France, where seventeen people were killed at four locations between the 7th and 9th of January 2015 – and similar events on other lands, from September 2001 (9/11) onwards – have led many people to speculate about the problem of, about causes of, and what may be required to prevent, such acts.

My admittedly fallible view, derived from my personal decades of experience, is that simple cause-and-effect answers are rather misguided, however naturally instinctive and/or politically expedient they might be – and/or however effective (or perhaps necessary) some of them might be in the short-term: of years, of a decade or more. For I incline toward the view that the long-term solution does not lie in more legislation, or in more security measures, or in idealizing one culture over and above another (as in the West verses Islam), or in invading other lands, or even in attempting to combat ‘extremism’ by means of advocation of a ‘moderate’ interpretation of some religion or some political ideology. Rather, the long-term solution lies in understanding our basal physis [2] as human beings and then considering how – or even if – that basal physis can be changed, evolved.

For the reality – the truth – of our being is that we humans can always find, and have always found – century after century, millennia after millennia – some cause or some ideology or some ideation or some interpretation of some religion or some dogma or some leader to allow us to express, to live, what is solely masculous [3]. For as I know from my own experience and involvements such an expression, such a living, vivifies, excites, and has so often provided us (or a significant portion of us) with a sense of purpose, an identity, and thus given our lives meaning.

Thus, for that significant portion of us, it is our basal nature – our basal character – as human beings which is at fault, the cause; not some current or past harsh interpretation of some religion or of some weltanschauung; not some ‘extremist’ ideology, per se; not some failure to tackle extremism; not some deficiency of law nor some failure (of intelligence, or otherwise) by the Police or by some State security service. That is, the harsh modern interpretation of a religion such as Islam (manifest for example in al-Qa’ida and in groups such as ad-Dawlah al-Islamiyah fil ‘Iraq wa ash-Sham), or the extremism manifest in nazism and fascism (past and present) are symptoms, not the cause.

For it is my considered opinion – fallible as it is and based as it is on what (admittedly limited) knowledge I have of the circumstances – that the perpetrators of recent events in France simply found, in a harsh interpretation of Islam, something which not only gave them a sense of purpose, a goal – which gave their lives meaning – but also provided them with an excuse to behave according to their physis or what they believed their physis should be: to be what they were or had become or should become. That is, lacking that empathy – such compassion and such honour, such muliebral virtues – as would have engendered within them a feeling for, an intuition of, and thus an appreciation of, innocency [4] and of individuals as individuals and not as abstracted ‘enemies’ or as somehow ‘inferior’ to them or as a means whereby what they believed in, or desired (such as some after-life), could be achieved.

In other words, a harsh modern interpretation of a particular religion hallowed what is masculous to the detriment of what is muliebral, making such a basal, such an unbalanced, masculous physis an ideal to be imitated and strived for, and which masculous ideal included the notion of a personal immolation, via kampf and a dishonourable disregard for the innocency of others, as a means to some posited goal. An unbalanced masculous physis also evident in – and idealized by – the ideologies of communism, nazism, and fascism, and in and by the ‘puritanical’ and inquisitorial interpretations of Christianity centuries before.

How then can that basal physis be changed or evolved? How can the masculous be balanced with the muliebral thus avoiding such unbalance, such bias toward the masculous, as has brought so much suffering recent and otherwise? All I have is a rather philosophical, quite long-term, and quite personal answer. Of, in terms of individuals, the development by individuals of empathy and the cultivation of the virtue of personal honour; and, in terms of society, Studia Humanitatis: that is, education to form, to shape, the manners and the character, of individuals by not only acquainting them with such topics as are, and were traditionally, included in that subject, but also of them being educated in such knowledge concerning our physis as our thousands of years old human culture of pathei-mathos has bequeathed to us [5].

David Myatt
January 2015

Notes

[1] As I have explained in many of my post 2009 writings, by extreme is meant to be harsh, so that I consider an extremist is a person who tends toward harshness, or who is harsh, or who supports/incites harshness, in pursuit of some objective, usually of a political or a religious nature. Here, harsh is: rough, severe, a tendency to be unfeeling, unempathic, uncompassionate.

Hence I consider extremism to be: (a) the result of such harshness, and (b) the principles, the causes, the characteristics, that promote, incite, or describe the harsh action of extremists. In addition, a fanatic is considered to be someone with a surfeit of zeal or whose enthusiasm for some objective, or for some cause, is intemperate.

[2] I use the term physis (φύσις) as a revealing, a manifestation, of not only the true nature of beings but also of the relationship between beings, and between beings and Being. Physis is often apprehended (and thus understood) by we humans as the nature, the character, of some-thing; as, for example, in our apprehension of the character of a person.

[3] By the term masculous is meant certain traits, abilities, and qualities that are conventionally and historically associated with men, such as competitiveness, aggression, a certain harshness, the desire to organize/control, and a desire for adventure and/or for conflict/war/violence/competition over and above personal love, compassion, and culture. In my view, extremist ideologies manifest an unbalanced, an excessive, masculous nature.

Masculous is from the Latin masculus and occurs, for example, in some seventeenth century works such as one by William Struther: “This is not only the language of Canaan, but also the masculous Schiboleth.” True Happines, or, King Davids Choice: Begunne In Sermons, And Now Digested Into A Treatise. Edinbvrgh, 1633

[4] I use the term ‘innocence’ to refer to a presumed attribute of those who, being personally unknown to us, are therefore unjudged by us and who thus, as honour requires, are given the benefit of the doubt. For this presumption of the innocency of others – until direct personal experience, and individual and empathic knowing of them, prove otherwise – is the fair, the reasoned, the honourable, the cultured, the virtuous, thing to do.

[5]  Refer to my May 2014 essay Education And The Culture Of Pathei-Mathos, and my more recent Some Conjectures Concerning Our Nexible Physis.