odal3

Lambasting Levey And Aquino
(pdf)

 

Contents include:

§ Anton LaVey And Anton Long: A Study In Modern Satanism
§ Knowledge And Culture Verses Plebeian Pretentiousness
§ The Satanic Bible
§ Michael Aquino Sounds Off Again About The Order Of Nine Angles
§ The Sad Sad Story of Michael Aquino


O9A. One Image, Ten Thousand Words

O9A Insight Role

 

In The Anonymous Denigration Of Myatt section of our article Modern Satanists And The Green-Eyed Monster we made mention of some allegations about Myatt by some anonymous propagandist and gave facts, omitted by the anonymous propagandist, regarding Myatt’s life. In another more recent article titled Suspicious Propaganda And The Exeatic Life of David Myatt, JB mentioned those comments, and concluded that in her opinion:

“in Myatt you have someone who seems to fit the profile of what an ONA person is or should be, regardless of whether he was or wasn’t Anton Long. That, at least to me and some others, make him someone to be admired and – perhaps – emulated.

That article by JB obviously upset the anonymous propagandist who replied with an article of his/her own, posted on his/her blog. In which article the anonymous propagandist again repeated his/her allegations and made the very silly blunder of claiming that Myatt was never interviewed by the BBC in the year 2000. This led to an exchange of opinions in the ‘comments’ section of his/her blog with the anonymous propagandist resorting to his/her usual tactic of ignoratio elenchi, writing that:

I wonder why even mildest criticism of Myatt and debunking his mythos bothers you. Oh wait, it’s rather obvious

To which we responded:

Once again you fail to admit your mistakes and instead of answering questions about why you continually attack and besmirch Myatt you (yet again) use ignoratio elenchi in an attempt to deflect attention away from yourself.

This led to a further exchange of comments, with the anonymous propagandist of course committing (yet again) the fallacies of argumentum ad hominem, ignoratio elenchi, and argumentum ad nauseam, the latter of which involved the anonymous propagandist repeating their mantra that they are only, really, truly, “demolishing the myths and legends that surround Myatt.”

There are no “myths and legends” surrounding Myatt; no need for such things because the documented facts of his life say all that needs to be said about him. Which is why, of course, the anonymous propagandist tries to discredit some of the sources that document aspects of Myatt’s life, writing as the anonymous propagandist does of “tabloid bloggers and shitty journalists and gullible academics.”

As a summary of the matter of the anonymous denigration of Myatt, and as an expose of the anonymous propagandist, we publish here a detailed reply addressed to him/her:


[quote]
Yet again you ignore the mistakes and the omissions you made about Myatt’s life. Instead, and as usual, you employ ignoratio elenchi and abusive ad hominem hoping that the attention of your readers will be diverted away from you and focus instead on the person who exposed your mistakes and omissions.

Judging by the replies here and elsewhere it’s a successful tactic. Which reveals just how gullible some people are.

It’s a tactic also used by self-described satanists when they, having written in derogatory terms about Myatt and the ONA, are taken to task for their errors and omissions and propaganda.

You wrote about Myatt’s life that {quote} The rest is mythos deliberately perpetrated… {/quote}

Which well describes how you and many latter-day satanists talk about Myatt. You and they perpetrate a myth about Myatt which you and they deliberately, month after month and year after year, propagate.

Your shared myth about Myatt goes like this (and we are paraphrasing your own words), “All Myatt ever did was take part in some minor street fights…talk to some Muslim friends, read Quran, attend mosques and participate in some Muslim forum…and write loads of propaganda.”

This myth – by omitting many documented facts about Myatt’s life – is meant to bring him down to the low level of the likes of Levey and try to show that he had an unremarkable rather ordinary life, and that – in your words – “he’s just an ordinary chap.”

You, however, omit Myatt’s violent years – during which he was arrested and convicted at least six times, and for which violence he served two terms of imprisonment.

You omit Myatt’s upbringing in Africa and the Far East and the fact that he attended a private prep school.

You omit Myatt’s leadership of a gang of thieves for which he was arrested and convicted on almost sixteen counts of “handling and receiving” stolen goods.

You omit what one academic described as “his global odyssey which took him on extended stays in the Middle East and East Asia, accompanied by studies of religions ranging from Christianity to Islam in the Western tradition and Taoism and Buddhism in the Eastern path. In the course of this Siddhartha-like search for truth, Myatt sampled the life of the monastery in both its Christian and Buddhist forms.”

You omit the dawn raid on his four-bedroom detached village house and his arrest there by a Special Operations police unit in 1998 on charges of incitement to murder and his three years on bail following that arrest during which time detectives from Scotland Yard worked with the FBI, Interpol, and RCMP, to find evidence sufficient to convict Myatt in a court of law.

You omit his intellectualism, evident in his translation of and commentary on three of the tractates of the Corpus Hermeticism.

You omit that he publicly and under his real name, and when it was unpopular and dangerous to do so, defended the 9/11 attacks and bin Laden and thus made himself liable to arrest and imprisonment. You omit that he travelled in Muslim lands preaching Jihad when it was dangerous to do so given the Western invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. You omit that an article he wrote about Jihad was for years on the website of Hamas.

You omit his poetry, his published letters, and his post-2011 (rather intellectual) philosophy of pathei mathos. You omit many other documented facts about his life.

Little wonder then, given the facts of his complex, rather extreme and far from ordinary life, why one academic described David Myatt as an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual.”

It’s also little wonder why some ONA people – and some academics – consider his documented life as a practical example of what following the ONA Seven Fold Way to the stage of Magus means in real life.

Which brings us to the real reason why you and self-described satanists assiduously propagate your demeaning myth about Myatt. Because if Myatt really was Anton Long, with his life a practical example of the ONA Seven Fold Way, then his life debunks all your and their lies and propaganda about the Order of Nine Angles. Revealing as such a life does what the ONA, and what being ONA, means and implies.

Finally, not content with omitting numerous facts about Myatt’s life you try, just like a propagandist addicted to weasel-words, to discredit objective sources of information about Myatt’s life, calling such sources “tabloid bloggers and shitty journalists and gullible academics.”

All of which are indicative of not only the type of person behind your pseudonym but also of your motives and that of so many self-described satanists.

[/quote]

 

Conclusion

As noted in the above quote, the real reason why the anonymous propagandist – and self-described satanists in general – assiduously propagate their demeaning myth about Myatt is because if Myatt really was Anton Long, with his life a practical example of the ONA Seven Fold Way, then his life debunks all their lies and propaganda about the Order of Nine Angles, revealing as such a life does what the ONA, and what being ONA, means and implies in the real world.

 


Article source: https://wyrdsister.wordpress.com/2017/01/14/concerning-an-anonymous-propagandist/


David Myatt

David Myatt

 

For a long time I, personally, have always respected Michael Aquino, founder of the Occult group the Temple of Set. Why such respect? Because, judged by his actions over some forty years and judged by what individuals who have known him have personally said or written about him to me, I judged him to be a person of integrity. Someone, that is, who would not knowingly besmirch a person’s reputation and someone who had and who upheld certain moral standards. Which is most befitting given that he was for years an officer in the United States military.

Thus it is with pleasure that my attention was drawn, by a comrade, to a posting that Aquino (on the 11th of October 2016) made on an internet forum and in which posting he not only reproduced a letter he had received, in the 1990s, from David Myatt but also mentioned that his correspondence with Myatt was “mutually courteous and respectful.”

Since some people who have associated themselves with the Order of Nine Angles seem intent on maligning and mocking Aquino, I reproduce in full here the aforementioned posting in which Aquino quotes from a letter he received from Myatt. The posting is as follows:


[Begin quotation]

My last correspondence with David Myatt [under his own name] occurred in February-March 1998 and was mutually courteous and respectful.

°°°

 David Myatt to M.A. 2/28/98:

Sir: It has come to my attention that you have frequently mentioned my name in connection with a certain “occult” group, alleging among other things that I am some sort of leader or sole member of this group. This is completely untrue. I am not “Anton Long” nor “Stephen Brown”. Neither am I an occultist! As for Mr C Beest, if you know people who had ever met him, you would know he is not yet thirty years old and could not possibly be me, being as I am almost fifty years old!

I am certainly a National-Socialist – that is, a NAZI. I have been a Nationalist-Socialist since I was sixteen years old. For your information I once many years ago infiltrated an occult group in the hope of using that group for NS ends – to propagate National-Socialism. It seemed a good idea at the time!

As far as I am concerned, National-Socialism and the occult are incompatible, and NS and Satanism certainly are! No one can be both a NS and a Satanist – you are either one or the other.

Yours, etc.
D. Myatt

°°°

So let us take Mr. Myatt at his word: that he is not “Long/Brown/Beest”, has no connection with “ONA”, and as he is a professed Nazi considers that it would be impossible for him to simultaneously be a Satanist.

In this case my disapproval of the “ONA” consequent to both the writings under its name and the manners of its professed adherents, are no reflection on Mr. Myatt. I do not know him personally beyond our brief, courteous correspondence almost two decades ago. I have absolutely no reason to wish him ill.

[End quotation]


While a few O9A’ers will doubtless believe that Aquino has fabricated that letter from Myatt, I personally am of the opinion that it is genuine since I accept Aquino’s honesty in this matter and know that Myatt’s letter expresses what Myatt has consistently written and said over many decades. For instance, that Myatt did “infiltrate an occult group in the hope of using that group for NS ends” and that he did believe that “National-Socialism and the occult are incompatible” as evidenced by his 1990s text  Occultism and National-Socialism (pdf).

What I find of particular interest is that the letter from Myatt apparently dates from shortly before – or shortly after – he was arrested for ‘incitement to murder’ following a Dawn Raid on his home by police officers from S012 (Special Branch) stationed at Scotland Yard.

Richard Stirling
2016


A pdf version of this article is available here: https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/myatt-strange-life-v2.pdf

David Myatt

David Myatt

The Strange Life Of David Myatt

One of the interesting things about the strange life of David Myatt is that there are several different interpretations of both his motives and his personality. The three most common interpretations – advanced and commented on by academics, by journalists, and others – are:

(i) That he is Anton Long, founder of the Occult group the Order of Nine Angles (ONA, O9A), and an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual” {1} who is “paramount to the whole creation and existence of the ONA,” {2} whose “Nazism and Islamism are merely instruments for the ONA’s underlying sinister esoteric plots.” {3}

(ii) That his somewhat itinerant adult life has been a Faustian, experiential, quest, with him drifting toward an unknown destination.

(iii) That he has been on a life-long ‘sinister-numinous’ quest, both Occult and practical (esoteric and exoteric), and has now discovered the wisdom and the self-understanding that is the goal of such a quest.

According to the first interpretation, his poetry {4}, his published private letters {5} and post-2011 writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos are either a clever ploy by a real-life Trickster to disguise his real ‘sinister’ nature or were written by someone else, or some others, as a deception.

According to the second interpretation – advanced by Myatt himself and some of his supporters – such writings are genuine and document the interior struggles, the vacillation, and the learning from experience, that occurred from around 2002 until 2010; struggles, vacillation, and a learning that he makes mention of in both his autobiography Myngath and in his essay The Development Of The Numinous Way.

According to the third interpretation – advanced by some supporters of the O9A – such writings document the feelings and the understanding germane to someone who, questing for decades along the O9A Seven Fold Way, has entered and passed beyond the Abyss and thus discovered Lapis Philosophicus.

In respect of which interpretation of Myatt’s life is the most plausible, it is my contention that Myatt’s poetry, his published private letters, and his post-2011 writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos, can provide the answer: that they hold all the clues necessary to arrive at a satisfactory and rational solution.


The Necessary Research

What is most surprising about those who advance and write about and believe one of the above explanations is that it appears that none of them have actually studied, in detail, and critically commented upon, Myatt’s poetry, his published (pre-2009) private letters and his post-2011 writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos.

For among the questions that should be asked, in relation to such works, are the following. (i) What do they express in terms of personal feelings and weltanschauung?  (ii) What do they reveal about the writer and his style of life? (iii) Are they internally – and over the time span under consideration (2002-2011) – consistent? (iv) How do they relate to Myatt’s life at the time they were written? (v) Are they all consistent with Myatt’s own explanation of his life as described in his autobiography Myngath {6} and in his post-2011 essays such as The Development Of The Numinous Way? (vi) Could someone who faked the letters – for whatever reason – maintain a consistency of feelings for so many years? {7}

Is what Myatt explained in Myngath the truth of his life or the sly words of a trickster? He wrote:

“For the reality of my past nine or so years is not that of some sudden life-changing revelation, but rather of a profound inner struggle whose genesis lay years before – in my experiences with and passion for women; in my time in a monastery; in my ever-growing love for Nature and my involvement with English rural life; in Sue’s illness and her tragic death.

This intense struggle was akin to an addiction, and I an addict addicted to abstractions. A struggle between my empathy, my understanding, my pathei-mathos, and my life-long belief, itself an abstraction, that somehow in some way I could make a positive difference to the world and that such abstractions as I adhered to, or aided or advocated were or could be a beginning for a better world, and that to achieve this new world certain sacrifice were, unfortunately, necessary.

A struggle which gave rise to what became – refined, and extended, year after year – The Numinous Way, and which struggle was an interior war to change myself, to actually live, every year, every month, every week, every day, suffused with an empathic awareness and a desire not to cause suffering; the struggle to abandon abstractions.

For nine years or so this interior struggle wore me down, until it gradually faded away. It was akin to cycling up a long steep mountain climb in mist and drizzly rain, struggling on against one’s aching body and against the desire to stop and rest; and not being able to see the end, the summit, of the climb. And then, slowly, the drizzle ceases, the mist begins to clear, the road becomes gradually less steep, and one is there – in warm bright sunshine nearing the summit of that climb, able to see the beautiful, the numinous, vista beyond, below, for the first time, and which vista after such an effort brings a restful interior peace, the silent tears of one person who feels their human insignificance compared to the mountains, the valleys below, the sky, the Sun, and the vast Cosmos beyond: the wyrdful nature of one fleeting delicate mortal microcosmic nexion which is one’s own life.”

Post-2009 Letters And Writings

In 2012 Myatt was contacted, via e-mail, by a journalist employed by the BBC and, over subsequent months, they exchanged correspondence via that medium. In 2013 Myatt published edited extracts from some of this correspondence in Part Three of his book Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination (ISBN 9781484854266). He also included some of this correspondence – and some other correspondence with a few other individuals around the same time (2011-2012) – in a posting on his weblog under the title Just My Fallible Views, Again. {8}

This correspondence is not only quite remarkable, given the various assumptions made about Myatt since at least the 1980s, but also is a significant development of the feelings expressed in his pre-2009 private letters. In those pre-2009 letters a certain lofty (even an arrogant) presumption of knowing – of having understood himself and the world – emerges time and time again, as well as certain pontifications based on various abstractions, while the later letters are replete with a certain humility. For instance, in one of these 2011-2012 letters he writes:

“The problem in the past had been me, my lack of understanding of myself and my egoism. It was my fault: not the place, not the time, not the people, for I so desired with that arrogance of youth to exchange this paradise, here, for those ideas, the idealism, the abstractions, I carried around in my prideful hubriatic head. Seldom content, for long, since happiness came with – was – the pursuit, or the gratification of my personal desires. So destructive, so very destructive. So hurtful, inconsiderate, selfish, profane […]

In a letter sent to the BBC journalist he wrote:

[My] recent propensity to be somewhat subsumed with a certain sadness [arose] from not only pondering on such questions as pathei-mathos, the causes/alleviation of suffering, and the nature of religion, expiation, and extremism, but also from understanding, from feeling, just how much suffering I personally have caused during my extremist decades and knowing that had it not been for the tragic death of a loved one some six years ago I would most probably have continued my career as a suffering-causing extremist.

He was even more explicit in another letter to a different correspondent and dated November 2012:

“The reason why I now do not – and have no desire to – “get involved with social change” (or to “go out into the world and try to give something back” as another correspondent recently expressed it) is the reality of me having made, and knowing and feeling I made, so many mistakes, shown such poor judgement, been so arrogant, so selfish, for so many decades – for most of my adult life. Given this reality, I simply do not trust myself anymore not to cause suffering, not to make even more mistakes, not to show poor judgement again. Just as I know my responsibility, my blame, for those my past mistakes and their human consequences. Thus, why would I want to inflict myself on the world anymore? […]

For the simple honest truth is that I now feel, in my very being, that I have no right to, can find no justification for me to – beyond that necessitated by personal honour in the immediacy of the moment – interfere in the lives of others, in however small a way even if my initial motives might be (or seemed to me to be) good. For who I am to judge, decide, things beyond the purvue of empathy and a very personal honour? I am just one fallible exceedingly error-prone human being with a long proven history of impersonal interference, of hubriatic, suffering-causing, and selfish, deeds. Someone who does not trust himself anymore and who values and tries to cultivate wu-wei.”

In a rather remarkable letter dated December 2nd 2012, he explained that:

“In respect of religion, there seems to have grown within me, this past year, a feeling regarding prayer, especially contemplative prayer, or rather that quiet way of being when – with no expectation of or belief in God – no words are desired or required and one is aware of the numinous in such an unaffected way that there is a calmness emanating not from within – not caused by our knowing or feeling of self – but from that ineffable vastness beyond which includes us and all the life that seeps into us, there in our stillness: emanations, of not only the dreams, the hopes, the love, the sadness, the sorrow, the grief, the pain, the joy, the tragedy, felt, known, experienced by we humans millennia after millennia, but also of the being, the essence, of the other life around us, here as Nature, and elsewhere, which, as we, ‘hath but a short time to live’.

A feeling, an intimation, of perhaps in some small way now understanding the Latin Opus Dei – Officium Divinum – as a needful daily reminder of our needful humility, as the plaintive cry Miserere Mei, Deus so reminds, and as the Namaz of Islam also so reminds with its Ruku, Sajdah, and recitation of Subhana Rabbiyal a’la. A needful daily reminder that we are transient beings, prone to dishonour, selfishness, and hubris, but who can be loving and kind, and beings prone to the charisma, the temptation, of words, either our own or those spoken or written by others. A reminder that we can so easily forget, have so often forgotten, that gentleness, that modest demeanour, that understanding, which derives from an appreciation of the numinous and also from one’s own admitted uncertainty of knowing and one’s acknowledgement of past mistakes. An uncertainty of knowing, an acknowledgement of mistakes, that often derive from πάθει μάθος.”

All these sentiments, these feelings, are so consistent over so many years, chime so well with his poetry, with the feelings that run through his pre-2009 letters, with his autobiography Myngath, and with post-2011 writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos, that it seems inconceivable to me that they are artful constructions – fakes – by someone else (or some others) or the product of some ‘sinister trickster’ who has consciously adopted a certain persona in order to try and fool people. Also, what they express is a mysticism, a reverence for and an appreciation of the numinous, so at odds with the ethos and the practice of Satanism – of whatever variety – that it is also inconceivable that they were written by a Satanist or even by a practising Occultist.

My conclusion, therefore, is that his somewhat itinerant adult life has been a Faustian, experiential, quest, with him drifting, stumbling, toward an unknown destination, which destination he has finally reached and which destination he in his post-2011 writings and letters has striven to describe.

JRW
2016

Notes

{1} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.

{2} Senholt, Jacob. The Sinister Tradition. Paper presented at the international conference, Satanism in the Modern World, Trondheim, 19-20th November, 2009.

{3} Per Faxneld: Post-Satanism, Left Hand Paths, and Beyond in Per Faxneld & Jesper Petersen (editors) The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity, Oxford University Press. 2012, p.207

{4} DW Myatt. Relict: Some Autobiographical Poems. 2014. ISBN 9781495448386.

{5} Letters dating from 2002 to 2009 are currently (September 2016) available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/selected-letters/ with a few of these (and other) letters included in Part Two of Myatt’s book Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination, published in 2013, ISBN 9781484854266.

Some letters dating from 2011 were included in Part Three of the aforementioned book.

{6} David Myatt. Myngath: Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life. 2013. ISBN 9781484110744.

{7} While those who believe the ‘fakery theory’ might object that there is no proof the letters were written on the dates given – that is, they might all have been faked within a relatively short period of time – the evidence indicates otherwise. For many of the letters were published on the website of a Myatt supporter from 2005 onwards, as the following link reveals: http://web.archive.org/web/20050205011512/http://www.geocities.com/davidmyatt/

The letters that are in the pdf compilation {5} and also available in that web archive, and in some subsequent archives, include the following: (i) Preco preheminencie, (ii) A Fine Day in Middle June, (iii) One Hot Sunny Day, Almost Mid-July; (iv) The Buzzards Are Calling Again; and so on.

{8} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/about/just-my-fallible-views-again/

°°°°°°°

Appendix

Some Quotations From The Letters of David Myatt (2002-2009)

[Untitled] February 2003

How foolish, to forget my own understanding: to forget the remembering, the pain, that shaped, changed, evolved such empathy as I possessed so much that – when alone as now in such places as this – I knew the past, felt the future, and, burdened by such knowing, tried hard to keep away the tears of so many centuries of sorrow, so little insight lived.

So hard, it seems, to renounce the passion of a life, as when a relationship of lovers falters, stalls, restarts to stall again; seldom a clean and sudden leaving. Feelings, memories, linger. And there is guilt. Let us not forget the guilt, the hope; the guilt of a duty abandoned […]

Tomorrow, I could have been elsewhere, in a teeming city, talking words of war as if my old hope of inspiring noble deeds to aid those far less fortunate than me was still real in a modern urban world too tired of silence, patience, and too afraid of numinous stillness. I choose not to go; not to speak, and instead will – the goddess permitting – sit here again suspended in time between brown, green and blue […]

If I have anything real to leave in remembrance, let it be such words as these: not the strife; not the anger; not the deaths; not the agitation for action. These are the words of a Spring, newly born between Sun and earth, bringing joy to a man whose hands, back and face have borne the cold toil of outdoor work in Winter.

I hope I do not forget this warmth, this beauty, again…

°°°°°°°

One Week Beyond Mid-Spring, 2003

It was hope – and another lost love – which took me, once and a decade or more ago, to Egypt to travel in the desert as if such traveling might bring a forgetful peace. It did not work, despite the grim toil of that long journey, and it was only when I returned to Cairo that I forgot. I remember it so well: I had gone, out of politeness, to a concert to see and listen to some singer which some Egyptian I had met enthused about. And there was such beauty there, in her, her voice, in the music, as she sang of many things. Such sadness; such joy, such an embracing, for me, of another world, another culture. I was at home there, listening, feeling, with the audience as the beautiful Samira Said sang, and ever since – in times of personal sadness, rejection, such as this – I remember her concert, or listen to her songs {1}, reminding me of how I am not alone, of how others have, and do, suffer, and have cried, and laughed, and sang of their problems, personal, political, social and otherwise. But most of all I remember that there is another world out there of different, vibrant, cultures, of good people striving in their daily mostly toiling lives with hope for a better more honourable world for themselves, their family, their children, their land.

1) In a recent letter Myatt added: “In the past few years she has changed her style somewhat, less Arabic, more Western. While this new style is interesting, some – myself included – prefer her earlier songs and recordings.”

 

°°°°°°°


[Untitled] April 2003

There is, of course, peace here, while the warm Sun lasts and there is some physical tiredness from the hours of physical work, and the very early, Dawn, start. But there is also not only an undercurrent of sad loneliness – for she whom I love has gone, to another – but also an intimation of the past when action, violence, in the world to change the world, brought that exhilaration which true, honourable, warriors know and often seek and which is an end to such loneliness…..

So, to be honest, there is temptation, even here, amid this quiet rural splendour: the temptation to be again what I was when action, a goal, a seeking, an assignment, made me a harmony of body, mind, soul, and life became suffused with a glory redolent of the gods because life was lived on a different, higher, level. There were then no obstacles that could not be overcome; no doubts; not even any self- reflexion.

Is this, then, just one of those periods in my life – of months, maybe a year – when I quietly drift, suffused with the numen, before returning to that other world, of duty, of exploration, of challenges, where lives the honourable warrior? I do not believe it is one of these periods, but I could be wrong; I have been wrong in the past.

°°°°°°°

We Have Been Led Astray, May 2003

How many times have I myself known the simple, gentle, warmth of a love shared? And how many times have I turned away from that toward what I assumed or believed or felt was a duty, thus hardening myself? So much lost, for so little. So much suffering and sadness created by me, in others, in the world: and for what? So much sadness and suffering caused within myself by such a loss.

The truth I have painfully, slowly, discovered in this, the fifth decade of my strange wandering life, is that there is no noble, no good, no honourable duty to anything or anyone which can contradict such love, or reject it, or place it second. What honourable, noble, duty there is can only arise from such love or join with that love in a natural, dwelling, way as when two people, a family, settle to dwell on the land and through their dwelling, their labour, their toil, their love, they create a way of life which is in harmony with all other life, with Nature, and especially with their own loving, rational, honourable, human nature.

This is the quiet numinous way of restraining ourselves by concentrating on what is beyond words, beyond ideas: the way that some of the beautiful music of the past several hundred years is an intimation of, reminding us as it can of the greatest suffering, the greatest joy, and of our own place among Nature, in the Cosmos.

This is the quiet return that is needed – beyond all rhetoric; beyond all propaganda; beyond all ideas, political, religious, otherwise – and beyond all the forms that constrain and try to mould our human nature to some abstract theory or construct. For what is human is this love, this symbiosis between such love, such dwelling, such a gentle seeking yearning born of our questioning nature. All else – all other types of yearning, seeking, striving, duty – detract us and distance us from, or even destroy and negate, our true human nature, and from that evolution of this nature of ours which great music, great Art, great literature, rational ethical Science itself, provide us with an intimation of, a gentle yearning for.

°°°°°°°

The Buzzards Are Calling Again, 2004

Many times, like the growing tree, there by that breeze, I have been swayed – swayed by the sleeping warrior within, who, awakened, has tempted me. So much dishonour in this world; so much I had to again strive to avoid involvement, ready as I was to go to defend the oppressed against the ignoble oppressor. It was, for me, the battle against dishonour that mattered, that called, that awoke – the living of the life of a warrior.

It was not the ideology, not the ideas, not the cause, or even the goals, for these were and are mere causal forms which do not, cannot, contain the essence itself even though, sometimes, they may presence part of it, as a Buzzard, circling, presences one small part of Nature’s life. What mattered then was the striving – the exhilaration of living which presenced honour in a moment, in an explosion of moments, so raising life up, upwards, towards a new living, a new way, nexion as it was to the essence itself, manifest as this essence was, is, can be, in the honour of a warrior. What mattered, then, was such a presencing by someone to redress the balance and bring some honour back into this world. Thus was I, am I, through such diverse presencing, such diverse involvement, a mystery to some, but not to myself… So I was swayed, tempted, and several times became alive again, a different alive as I forsook this quiet reclusive peace to travel, to engage, to live for a while a different way. And now, my work here having ended, I strain again against myself, feeling, feeling the presencing of that past, of those moments of life’s ecstasy.

What of my words, this past year, born of such peace, of such silent wisdom as has kept me here in this place? Have they changed anything, anyone? I do not think so. Are they then as flowers thrusting forth in Spring, born only to die each year, seeding themselves with the hope of rebirth in some future? I do not know, and shall lay this pen aside to close my eyes to I lie on my old coat upon the growing greening grass of one more burgeoning beautiful English Spring.


 

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

The Question of Anton Long And David Myatt

For decades allegations have been made that Anton Long – founder of the Order of Nine Angles (ONA, O9A) in the early 1970s {1}{2} and author of most of its Occult texts {3} – was the pseudonym of David Myatt, a former neo-nazi activist regarded as “the leading hardline Nazi intellectual in Britain since the 1960s” {4} and as “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution.” {5}

Such allegations – including the one that since Myatt is Long he is also a Satanist – have led to some academics, and many Occultists, to assume – or to accept without question – that Myatt is Long {6}, despite Myatt’s persistent denials and despite no one, in some thirty years, having provided any credible evidence based on research using primary sources {7}. The only detailed examination, so far, of a possible connection has been by Senholt who devoted some 24 pages to the topic {8} although his conclusion that there is a connection is ‘not proven’ because his analysis is based on secondary – not primary – sources and he relies on various assumptions, such as there being some similarity between some events in Myatt’s life (neo-nazi activism and involvement with radical Islam) and some of the Insight Roles suggested by the O9A, and that Myatt’s idea of a ‘Galactic Imperium’ is echoed in some texts written by Anton Long.

As JR Wright mentioned in her essay about Myatt and the ONA {9}, those who accept that Myatt is Anton Long and therefore a Satanist have to explain:

not only the lack of factual evidence proving he is a satanist but also many other things about Myatt’s life, among which are the following:
1) His time as a Christian monk and his many subsequent writings praising Catholicism in particular and Christianity in general.
2) His Occultism and National-Socialism text – written in the 1980’s and republished in the 1990’s and again around 2006 – and in which he denounced occultism.
3) The “small matter” of him being married in Church in accordance with the Christian ceremony of marriage.
4) His semi-autobiographical poetry.
5) His voluminous writings about the hubris of extremism, and about his rejection of and his remorse concerning his extremist past.
6) An extensive seven hour search of his home by six Detectives from Scotland Yard in 1998 failed to find any occult items or literature.
7) A forensic analysis, by the police, of Myatt’s seized computers following his arrest in 1998 failed to find any occult material.


The Early Life Of David Myatt

Several academics have referred to Myatt’s early life {1}{8}{10}(11}(12}, stating that he was born, in 1950, in Tanganyika (now known as Tanzania) when that land was still under British control; that he was educated there; that he later lived in the Far East, and came to live in England in the late 1960s. While these details are sketchy, Myatt himself in his autobiography Myngath provides a few more details {13}. He relates, for example, that he was privately educated in Africa, and that during his teens in the Far East he studied Ancient Greek and learned to read Sanskrit. In several letters and later writings he mentions trips, in the early 1970s, to the Middle East and Iran accompanied on at least one trip by a gay female (possibly Iranian) friend he had met at university. {14} In addition Myatt has mentioned that his father provided him, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with an allowance sufficient to enable him to travel where he liked and purchase whatever books he happened to be interested in.

This rather eclectic, somewhat itinerant, and possibly privileged early life (in a letter to one correspondent Myatt mentions his family having servants), is certainly interesting and most certainly deserves further research based on primary sources. Which research might provide some clarification in respect of the assumption that Myatt was/is Anton and thus that “the role of David Myatt [is] paramount to the whole creation and existence of the ONA.” {15}

Hearsay And Rumours

For decades, individuals such as Michael Aquino – famed for his foundation of the Occult group the Temple of Set and for his earlier friendship with Howard Stanton Levey – have, for whatever personal and/or ideological reasons, circulated rumours about Myatt and about the O9A. Thus, in a recent (2016) posting on some internet forum Aquino not only made known his ignorance of O9A esoteric philosophy but also unequivocally stated, yet again, that “he [Myatt] was confirmed to me as Anton Long,” while failing to provide any evidence from primary sources to confirm such hearsay. {16}

Given such hearsay, and the continued allegations that Myatt is Anton Long, it is incumbent on those who repeat such hearsay and such allegations to provide evidence based on primary sources. Until they do – and until academics  also provide credible evidence based on research using primary sources – it will remain a mystery as to whether David Myatt really is (or was) Anton Long.

R. Parker
2016

Notes

{1} Monette, Connell. Mysticism in the Twenty First Century. Sirius Academic Press, 2013. p.86

{2} Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in the Sinister Tradition: Political Esotericism and the Convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism, and National Socialism in the Order of Nine Angles, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Aagaard Petersen (editors), The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press. 2013. pp. 254–256

{3} Senholt, op.cit. p.256; Monette, op.cit. p.86

{4} Simon Wiesenthal Center: Response, Summer 2003, Vol 24, #2

{5} Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (USAF), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.

{6} For instance, Goodrick-Clarke, in his book Black Sun simply states that Myatt is Long and then proceeds to use their names interchangeably. Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press. 2003, pp.215-216.

{7} Primary sources include direct evidence such as original documents dating from the period under study, and accounts and works (written, verbal, published or unpublished) by such individuals whose life or whose writings or whose works form part of the research. In addition, if such sources – documents or accounts or writings – are in another language, then it is incumbent upon the scholar to have knowledge of that language and thus be able to translate such documents themselves, for a reliance upon the translations of others relegates such sources from the position of primary ones to secondary ones.

{8} Senholt, op.cit. pp.250–274.

{9} JR Wright. David Myatt, Satanism, and the Order of Nine Angles. e-text, 2012 (revised 2016). A pdf version is currently (September 2016) available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/david-myatt-and-the-o9a/

{10} Michael, George. The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas. 2006. pp. 142-144.

{11}  Kaplan, Jeffrey. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield. 2000. p. 216ff; p.512f

{12} Goodrick-Clarke, op.cit. pp.216ff

{13} Myatt, David. Myngath: Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life. 2013. ISBN 9781484110744. It should be noted that, according to academic criteria, an autobiography is a primary source.

{14} Some his letters have been published in a 2009 pdf collection edited by JR Wright and titled Selected Letters of David Myatt, 2002-2008. They are currently (September 2016) available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/selected-letters/

Some of Myatt’s other correspondence is included in part 2 and 3 of his book Understanding and Rejecting Extremism
A Very Strange Peregrination, [ISBN 9781484854266], while many of his post-2012 essays are autobiographical, such as the two Questions for DWM of 2014 and 2015, and the Development Of The Numinous Way, available (as of September 2016) at https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/

(15} Senholt, Jacob. The Sinister Tradition. Paper presented at the international conference, Satanism in the Modern World, Trondheim, 19-20th November, 2009.

{16} In respect of Aquino’s latest rumour-mongering, qv. his recent diatribes about Myatt on some self-described ‘satanic’ internet forum, some of which are reproduced in the “Michael Aquino Sounds Off Again About The Order Of Nine Angles” and the two-part “The Sad Sad Story of Michael Aquino” sections of the following pdf document: https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/lambasting-levey.pdf


David Myatt

David Myatt

It was with some amusement that I read – at disparate times some months apart – what two people wrote this year about Mr Myatt and lying. One blogger questioned how sincere Myatt was in his writings and wondered whether he deliberately spread ‘disinformation’ about himself, while an academic wrote in a recent book that “if scholarship has correctly identified him as the mastermind behind the Order of Nine Angles [then his denial of being Anton Long] does not bode well for his sincerity.”

I was reminded of their words (and so many similar ones) today when reading a column in The Guardian, and suggest that they and others – given their wonderment about and accusations regarding Myatt lying – read what the Guardian columnist Andrew Brown had to say in the Saturday 30 July 2016 edition of that newspaper.

Here, a few quotations from that column which may possibly answer their wonderment regarding and accusations about Mr Myatt lying.

“Why do the English lie so much? […] It’s not a coincidence that one of the classic novels about how to be an English gentleman is Beau Geste, in which the entire plot hinges on the moral necessity of lying. Honour demands all kinds of heroism and horrible deaths from the brothers, but it never asks them to tell the truth […] What makes English manners so peculiarly difficult is that you can never be entirely certain the person you are talking to is in fact lying. Sometimes they will be entirely sincere, even when it is not to their advantage to do so. Sometimes they will mean to be sincere, by saying something that you’re meant to understand is untrue, but fail, because you think they are telling the truth – and then the blame for their insincerity is entirely yours.”

R.P.
July 2016


O9A. One Image, Ten Thousand Words

 

O9A: Managing The Chaos?
(pdf)


Order of Nine Angles

O9A

Order of Nine Angles: Praising Islam
(pdf)


Order of Nine Angles

O9A

 

The Occult And Academia

In respect of the subject now often denoted by the term Western esotericism, can a lecturer or a faculty member at an established, mainstream, university or college be relied upon to present a well-researched, unbiased, scholarly, article or book?

Consider, for example, a recent (2016) book published by the prestigious Oxford University Press, Children of Lucifer: The Origins of Modern Religious Satanism, written by Ruben Van Luijk. This book devotes several pages (371-373) to the Order of Nine Angles (ONA, O9A) and to Anton Long, making various unsubstantiated claims while in the process getting almost every fact about Myatt wrong. That such an author, published by such an academic press, could make so many unsubstantiated claims and so many mistakes in so few pages – mistakes arising from a lack of research using primary sources – does not inspire confidence in the rest of the book nor in the process of academic peer review.

The mistakes by Van Luijk about David Myatt include:

1) That Myatt joined the ‘British National Socialist Movement’ in 1968. Myatt in fact joined Colin Jordan’s British Movement that year, Jordan having disbanded his short lived ‘National Socialist Movement’ earlier in the year.

2) Van Luijk writes that Myatt’s pamphlet A Practical Guide To Aryan Revolution “included detailed instructions for the manufacture of explosives and the incitement of racial war.”

It seems that Van Luijk has not bothered to find and read that pamphlet, for while it does “incite racial war” (in the Racial War section) it does not contain detailed instructions about making bombs, with it being apparent that Van Luijk has confused that pamphlet with another similar one also attributed to Myatt {1}, the 15-page printed document circulated in the 1990s which announced the formation of The White Wolves and which document did indeed contain instructions on how to make home-made bombs, complete with diagrams.

That the pamphlet A Practical Guide To Aryan Revolution – attributed to Myatt – has never in its entirely been republished (on the internet or otherwise) and is not available in easily accessible academic libraries, surely makes it incumbent upon accredited scholars who wish to comment upon it to seek out and read it in its entirely in such few places as it can still be found.

3) Van Luijk repeats the claim made by certain other authors that Myatt is Anton Long without (i) providing any evidence from his own research using primary sources that Myatt is indeed Anton Long, and without (ii) referencing any academic sources which, on the basis of scholarly research using primary sources, have proven that Myatt is Long. {2} Furthermore, that there are no such academic sources which, on the basis of scholarly research using primary sources, have proven that Myatt is Long, is never mentioned by Van Luijk.

4) Van Luijk writes that Myatt was “initiated in 1968 by the female leader of a Wicca coven.” Nowhere, in the writings of Anton Long, is there any claim to have been initiated either in 1968 or by someone from a wicca coven. Rather, the claim made by the pseudonymous Anton Long is of being initiated in the early 1970s and by the daughter of a lady associated with a pagan, occult, tradition.

The unsubstantiated claims of Van Luijks about the O9A include:

1) That the name ‘Order of Nine Angles’ suggests inspiration from the ‘satanism’ of Howard Stanton Levey and his Church of Satan, whereas a reading of (i) basic O9A texts such a The Order of Nine Angles Rite of The Nine Angles: A Comparison with the Ceremony of Nine Angles by Aquino And A Brief Study of The Meaning of The Nine Angles, and (ii) of Professor Monette’s conclusion that “it is clear despite claims that the term ‘nine angles’ was introduced in the twentieth century, the term is centuries older, especially in esoteric or cosmological discourse,” {3} would have revealed there was no such inspiration.

Myatt himself even makes a comparison with the ancient Somnium Scipionis described by Cicero, in De Re Publica, Book VI, 17, which mention of ‘nine’ pre-dates Levey and his Church of Satan by over a thousand years.

2) That the O9A accept the Judaeo-Christian version of Satan, whereas a reading of basic O9A texts such as The Geryne of Satan would have revealed that the O9A do not accept that version of Satan, giving rise to the O9A understanding of a satanist as a person who – ‘diabolically’ or otherwise – is opposed to those who believe  themselves to be God’s chosen people; that is, someone opposed to the Jews.

3) That the O9A is just a development of the ‘satanism’ of Howard Stanton Levey, whereas a study of the O9A corpus, from the 1980s on, and O9A works such as the compilation The Esoteric Hermeticism Of The Order Of Nine Angles, would have revealed that the O9A represent an occult, essentially pagan, tradition wholly different from the qabalistic-centred occult tradition used by Crowley, Levey, Aquino, and other modern occultists. A difference evident in the O9A’s Seven Fold Way and their occult septenary system.

4) That the O9A Star Game is just a ‘board game’, whereas a reading of basic O9A texts such as Naos would have revealed its three-dimensional and unique nature, a uniqueness derived from the transformation of each piece when it is moved and the alchemical combinations and occult associations of each piece.

The lack of detailed, scholarly, research and the mistakes made by Van Luijk are unfortunately typical of many of the books and articles written by academics about modern Satanism in particular and the Western, occult, Left Hand Path in general, with many authors of recent works relying for instance on the opinions of others (and, sometimes, even relying on anonymous persons communicated with by means of e-mail) rather than undertaking their own years-long research using primary sources.

Thus, in respect of Western esotericism, can a lecturer or a faculty member at an established, mainstream, university or college be relied upon to present a well-researched, unbiased, scholarly, article or book? The answer, more often than not, is no, for so many such books and articles are written by those who, despite being accorded the status of academics, are not scholars because their approach to the subject they write about it is quite unscholarly. {2}

R. Parker
2016

This a revised version of an article previously circulated under the title More Unscholarly Research.

Notes

{1} Searchlight, July 2000.

{2} Correctly understood, a scholarly approach means undertaking a meticulous, unbiased, research into a specific subject over a period of some years using, wherever possible, primary sources; formulating an opinion based on such learning, such knowledge, as results from such research, and in respect of writing academic papers and books about the subject providing copious, accurate, references to the source material. Primary sources include direct evidence such as original documents dating from the period under study, and accounts and works (written, verbal, published or unpublished) by such individuals whose life or whose writings or whose works form part of the research. In addition, if such sources – documents or accounts or writings – are in another language, then it is incumbent upon the scholar to have knowledge of that language and thus be able to translate such documents themselves, for a reliance upon the translations of others relegates such sources from the position of primary ones to secondary ones.

Hence, if the author of an academic book or academic paper writes about a person and/or about their works, or about an event, using only secondary sources – sources containing the opinions, the interpretations, or the conclusions of others – then the opinion, the interpretation, the conclusions of that author about such a person and/or about their works, or about an event, are unauthoritative because unscholarly.

{3} Monette, Connell (2013). Mysticism in the 21st Century. Sirius Academic Press. p.105.



Order of Nine Angles

The O9A Septenary

For at least the past thirty years there has been much speculation – in books, in articles in magazines, in newspapers and in academic journals, and latterly via the medium of the internet – about whether David Myatt is the person behind the pseudonym Anton Long, and thus is the person who founded the occult group the Order of Nine Angles (ONA, O9A), authored its esoteric philosophy [1] and at least 95% of its texts from books such as The Black Book of Satan, Naos, the Deofel Quartet, to tracts such as Culling As Art, Guidelines for the Testing of Opfers, Concerning Esoteric and Exoteric Languages, and those in the 2010 collection The Requisite ONA: A Practical Guide to The Sinister Sorcery of The Order of Nine Angles.

While Myatt himself has always denied being Anton Long and challenged anyone to provide actual evidence that he is in fact Anton Long, his denial has not stopped anti-fascist groups such as Searchlight – and more recently ‘hope not hate’ – nor journalists nor the majority of modern self-declared Satanists from blithely asserting that Myatt is Anton Long. Neither has Myatt’s repeated denial stayed the hand of those who – again blithely, without providing any supporting evidence – state that ‘Myatt is a Satanist’ and that he was and still is ‘involved with the Satanic Order of Nine Angles’, and therefore knows or is a friend or colleague of or is somehow involved with, or supports the opinions and views of, anyone anywhere who without any evidence declares themselves to be ONA or is by others assumed to be ONA

So common did it – and has it – become for people to assume Myatt is Long that, as Senholt noted [2], the author Goodrick-Clarke in his book Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity [3] used the name Myatt when referring to what Anton Long had written or what others alleged Long had done, written, or said, without Goodrick-Clarke providing any supporting evidence for his assumptions.

However, as JR Wright mentioned in the 2013 edition of her article David Myatt, Satanism, and the Order of Nine Angles:

“Several academics who have studied the Order of Nine Angles have concluded that David Myatt is not Anton Long. For instance George Sieg wrote that the idea that Myatt is Long is “implausible and untenable based on the extent of variance in writing style, personality, and tone” between Myatt and Long’s writings. Professor Connell Monette considered it was quite possible that ‘Anton Long’ was a pseudonym used by multiple individuals over the past 30 years, while Professor Jeffrey Kaplan asserted that Myatt and Long are separate people and that the individual who used the pseudonym Anton Long was a friend of Myatt’s in the 1970s and 1980s.” [4]

As for Myatt, he has from the 1980s on consistently maintained that his involvement with occultism in the 1970s and early 1980s was, in his words,

“for the singular purpose of subversion and infiltration in the cause of National-Socialism, with part of this being to spread racist ideas and denial of the holocaust. Thus one such occult group I associated with was a honeytrap, and the whole intent was political, revolutionary, not occult and not to with ‘satanism’. It was a matter of using, or trying to use, such occult groups for a specific neo-nazi purpose without any interest in or personal involvement with the occult.” [5]

Which fact Myatt communicated in the 1990s to Professor Kaplan [6], and to others [7].

Thus, unless and until someone provides substantive evidence – for example in the form of authentic documents, or video recordings of Myatt at some ONA ceremony, or verifiable statements by Myatt himself or by the person who – suspected by some to be Anton Long – was “a friend of Myatt’s in the 1970s and 1980s” – then such claims that “Myatt is Anton Long”, and that “Myatt is or was a Satanist” will remain unproven, mere rumours and hearsay, and thus will be dismissed by those who use reason and honour as their guides.

For as Monette wrote, “the founder of the [ONA], Anton Long, has remained a mystery to members of the movement, as well as to academics.” [8]

Which is perhaps as it should be: a mystery, as befits an occult group which so many self-declared modern Satanists – following as they do the satanism propagated by Howard Stanton Levey, by Aquino, and by others – seek and have sought to discredit and belittle and who continue to emote that “the ONA is a joke, a fake” and who declare that it “doesn’t exist” despite the fact that the ONA is not only a particular and complex esoteric philosophy and thus – having been written about in printed books – has a place in the domain of reality and thus an objective being, but is also “a movement, a subculture or perhaps metaculture that its adherents choose to embody or identify with.” [8]

Which mystery also befits the persona of Anton Long who – in the supposed guise of David Myatt – so many self-declared modern Satanists, so many self-declared followers of some modern Western Left Hand Path, so many self-declared ‘thelemites’, and so many others – for whatever reason and from what motive – dislike and seek to defame, to castigate, and to libel. As Tennyson once wrote: “the grand old name of gentleman, defamed by every charlatan”. To which we might add “and defamed by ideologically – or financially – motivated hack writers and journalists”.

Richard Stirling
January 2016

[1] The esoteric philosophy of the ONA is detailed in the 2013 article The Radical Sinister Philosophy of Anton Long: A Review of The Contemporary Secret Society Known As The Order of Nine Angles, which is currently [January 2016] available at https://lapisphilosophicus.wordpress.com/about-2/philosophy-of-anton-long/ and archived at http://www.webcitation.org/6ewvIIDOs

That this esoteric philosophy – and the praxises derived from it or which ‘presence’ it – has roots in European paganism and Greco-Roman mysticism has been explained by R. Parker in works such as ἀρρενόθηλυς: Alchemical And Hermetic Antecedents Of The Seven Fold Way Of The Order Of Nine Angles (e-text, 2015) and books such as The Pagan Order of Nine Angles, 2015, ISBN ISBN 978-1518885143.

[2] The Sinister Tradition. Paper presented by Jacob Senholt at the international conference Satanism in the Modern World, Trondheim, 19-20th November, 2009. The paper is available [as of January 2016] at http://www.webcitation.org/6bpiHBIrr (pdf)

[3] New York University Press, 2002. ISBN 978-0814731550.

[4] The article is currently [January 2016] archived at http://www.webcitation.org/6ewuZhSas

The references cited in the article are as follows:

§ Sieg, George. Angular Momentum: From Traditional to Progressive Satanism in the Order of Nine Angles. International Journal for the Study of New Religions, volume 4, number 2. 2013. p.257.

§ Monette, Connell. Mysticism in the 21st Century. 2013. Sirius Academic Press. p.92

§ Kaplan, Jeffrey. Religiosity and the Radical Right: Toward the Creation of a New Ethnic Identity, in Jeffrey Kaplan and Tore Bjørgo (editors), Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture. Northeastern University Press. 1998. p.115.

[5] Myatt, David. A Matter of Honour. e-text, 2012.

[6] Kaplan, op cit.

[7] Letter from David Myatt to a Mr. Williams dated July 1994. The letter is mentioned by Kaplan, op cit, p.125, with Kaplan writing that “Myatt frankly states that his own long history of interaction with England’s occult underground was undertaken in a clandestine effort to influence some of these adherents to adopt National Socialist beliefs.”

[8] Monette, op cit.