A Very Different Perspective

odal3

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A Very Different Perspective
(pdf)

The compilation conveniently gathers together articles published in late 2017 and early 2018 all but one of which discuss or which review some of David Myatt’s recent books and essays. The articles draw attention to or explain various aspects of Mr Myatt’s philosophy and metaphysical writings such as his usage of terms such as “the numinous” and the “new pagan metaphysics” which he has proposed.

The one exception is the article titled Decoding The Life Of Myatt which provides an overview of Mr Myatt’s controversial life.

As the authoress of one of the articles included notes, “there is a cultural revolution in the truths embedded in the book Regarding Western Paganism And Hermeticism and in the [Myattian] texts referenced therein. But whether such truths can replace the prevalent and mistaken belief that Christianity is somehow the embodiment of Western culture remains to be seen.”

As noted in another article also included, recent works by Myatt provide “an intellectual basis for a new, an enlightened, paganism firmly rooted in an understanding of our debt to Greco-Roman, pagan, culture.”


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Decoding The Life Of Myatt

David Myatt

David Myatt

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Decoding The Life Of Myatt

One of the most common assumptions made about David Myatt – often made and repeated by anonymous persons by means of the internet – is that he has flitted from one cause to another, from one extreme (neo-nazi) to another extreme (radical Islam) and from one religion to another (Catholicism, Buddhism, Islam, Paganism) to end up founding “his own religion”, The Numinous Way.

That those making and repeating such an assumption are ill-informed and/or ignorant, with the assumption itself being prejudicial, is obvious if one studies the life of Myatt in detail.

The first relevant fact is that Myatt was a dedicated National Socialist activist and ideologue for thirty years (1968-1998). That is, for the major part of his adult life, and for a period most probably longer than many of his ‘anonymous internet detractors’ have been alive. This three decade long period of his life led to him being described as “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution.” {1}

The second relevant fact is that Myatt was a proponent of radical Islam – of Jihad – for ten years (1998-2008) during which decade he spent at least half of it in a campaign to form an alliance between National Socialists and Jihadists {2} so that they could fight what he regarded as their common enemy: Zionists and the Zionist entity that currently occupies Palestine. His campaign led to him being described as “emblematic of the modern syncretism of radical ideologies” {3} and as an “example of the axis between right-wing extremists and Islamists.” {2}{4} At a NATO conference in 2005 it was stated that Myatt, as a Muslim, had called on “all enemies of the Zionists to embrace the Jihad” against Jews and the United States {5}.

The third relevant fact – derived from the previous two – is that Myatt thus spent forty years of his life (1968-2008) actively campaigning against “the same enemy”, namely Jews and Zionists; that is, against what neo-nazis and others have termed ZOG, the Zionist Occupation Government.

Spending forty years of one’s life actively engaged in fighting the same enemy is most certainly not “flitting from one cause to another, from one extreme to another.”

Which decades-long dedication to a particular cause led to one academic writing that

“Even more astonishing than this transition [from neo-nazi to Muslim], is that it seems both his Nazism and Islamism are merely instruments for the ONA’s [Order of Nine Angles] underlying sinister esoteric plots.” {6}

Which brings us to consideration of Myatt’s possible motives; of what his five decades of peregrinations – from 1968 to 2018 – were all about.

The Peregrinations Of Mr Myatt

Myatt’s admittedly strange life has led to speculation about his intent, with one academic – reviewing the book in which the “underlying sinister esoteric plots” quotation occurs – describing Myatt as an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual.” {7}

Over the past ten years the speculation has ranged from (i) the aforementioned “instruments for the ONA’s underlying sinister esoteric plots,” to suggestions that (ii) he is a government agent provocateur, to (iii) him being on a life-long personal Faustian quest perhaps in hope of discovering ‘truth’, to (iv) him as a youthful fanatic who slowly, gradually, over decades learns from his experiences – political, religious, and personal – and thus changing, evolving, as a person.

In the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation he is “Anton Long”, founder of the Occult group the Order of Nine Angles, with his role being “paramount to the whole creation and existence of the ONA” {8} and with his life being regarded by many involved in the Occult sub-culture that is the ONA/O9A {9} as a documented example of the ONA’s Seven Fold Way {10}. Thus, “Myatt’s life-long devotion to various extreme ideologies has been part of a sinister game that is at the heart of the ONA.” {11}

In regard to the “government agent provocateur” interpretation, as Canadian author and satirist Jeff Wells wrote:

“Is Myatt an agent provocateur, a shit-disturber who can’t settle upon a radical philosophy, something more, or something less? It’s difficult to assess motive, but consider that he has been arrested numerous times for such things as writing and disseminating “practical terrorist guides” [and] on suspicion of conspiracy to murder. These cases have always been dropped due to “lack of evidence.” Does he enjoy protection? The record is suggestive that he does. And if it appears so, then we should ask the next question: Why?

Myatt may seem to have flitted from one politico-religious philosophy to another, but there is a terrible thread of continuity and rigour through his life and writings that suggests he is much more than a disingenuous provocateur. Naziism and Islamicism have served, in turn, as modalities of disruption for what remains at core an occult working to sow general chaos and division – the necessary passage of “Helter Skelter” to break down the Old Order, before the founding of the New.

So again: whose interests are served by there being a David Myatt? Is he is own man – or men – or does he belong to someone else? Or is it something else – an intelligence service perhaps.” {12}

As one proponent of this interpretation suggested, the O9A

“may well have been created by a state asset as a means of gathering intelligence and recruiting suitable individuals to undertake acts of subversion, extremism, and terrorism, under the pretext of occult training.” {13}

In the “Faustian quest” interpretation, Myatt – according to one academic, undertook

“a global odyssey which took him on extended stays in the Middle East and East Asia, accompanied by studies of religions ranging from Christianity to Islam in the Western tradition and Taoism and Buddhism in the Eastern path. In the course of this Siddhartha-like search for truth, Myatt sampled the life of the monastery in both its Christian and Buddhist forms.” {14}

In the “youthful fanatic who slowly over decades changes” interpretation, Myatt was an arrogant idealist who selfishly placed some cause before family and loved ones but whose varied experiences over decades gradually changed him, with there being no “Siddhartha-like search for truth” and no “underlying sinister esoteric plots”. Instead, as he wrote in his autobiography Myngath,

“As often in my life, it seemed as if the Fates revealed to me the direction in which I should go. Thus, and yet again, there was a certain period of drifting, by me, until a particular course of life seemed obvious, even to me.” {15}

Conclusion

The fact that Myatt’s life – as currently documented – is open to various interpretations is interesting, with it being for us to decide which interpretation to accept based on what level of knowledge of Myatt’s life and works we possess, on what aspect or aspects of his life and works we concentrate on, and – perhaps most important of all – on whether or not we already have a prejudicial opinion of the man.

At present, neither the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation nor the “government agent provocateur” interpretation are evidentially supported by primary sources relating to the life and writings of Myatt {16}{17}. Instead, they are based on non-evidential assumptions – often concerning Myatt’s intent – or, in case of academics and in the matter of the O9A, on fallacious reasoning as for example in the committal by Senholt of the Fallacy of Incomplete Evidence {18} and the committal of the fallacy of Illicit Transference by Massimo Introvigne {19} and by Della E. Campion. {20}

Since there is no scholarly biography of Myatt’s life based both on primary sources and on a detailed analyses of his post-2011 writings, his poetry, and his “philosophy of pathei-mathos” {21} the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation and the “government agent provocateur” interpretation constitute personal opinion and/or serve (i) as examples of a lack of scholarly research, (ii) as examples of the use of forgeries, such as Diablerie and Bealuwes Gast {22}, and (iii) as examples of fallacious reasoning.

My own detailed study of currently accessible primary sources – sources {17} essential to understanding Myatt’s life and to placing his extremist decades into perspective – inclines me to favour the “youthful fanatic who slowly over decades changes” interpretation.

For example, Myatt wrote in 2012 that

“what exposed my hubris – what for me broke down that certitude-of-knowing which extremism breeds and re-presents – was not something I did; not something I achieved; not something related to my character, my nature, at all. Instead, it was a gift offered to me by two others – the legacy left by their tragic early dying. That it took not one but two personal tragedies – some thirteen years apart – for me to accept and appreciate the gift of their love, their living, most surely reveals my failure, the hubris that for so long suffused me, and the strength and depth of my so lamentable extremism.” {23}

In a 2012 letter written to a BBC journalist and later included in his book Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination, {24} – both of which are primary sources – Myatt wrote,

“The problem in the past had been me, my lack of understanding of myself and my egoism. It was my fault: not the place, not the time, not the people, for I so desired with that arrogance of youth to exchange this paradise, here, for those ideas, the idealism, the abstractions, I carried around in my prideful hubriatic head. Seldom content, for long, since happiness came with – was – the pursuit, or the gratification of my personal desires. So destructive, so very destructive. So hurtful, inconsiderate, selfish, profane.”

In 2014 he wrote,

“In a very personal sense, my philosophy of pathei-mathos is expiative, as are my writings concerning extremism, such as my Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination published last year. Also expiative is my reclusiveness. But such things – as is only just and fitting – do little to offset the deep sadness felt, except in fleeting moments.” {25}

Such are the words, the feelings, of someone who as a result of pathei-mathos has been interiorly changed. Someone who – unusually, having spent forty years as a revolutionary activist, as “a theoretician of terror” {26} who was regarded as a “principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution” {1} – has moved from extremist to mystic. {27}

It is my conclusion that it is only those who have not studied or who are ignorant of currently accessible Myattian primary sources who can maintain that “Myatt flitted from one cause to another” or who can believe fallacious interpretations such as that involving “sinister esoteric plots”.

Morena Kapiris
May 2018 ev
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{1} Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (United States Air Force), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.

{2} Michael, George. The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, 2006. p. 142ff.

{3} Jon B. Perdue. The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71.

{4} Mark Weitzman. Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus, in Thomas Greven: Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte in der Ära der Globalisierung. 1 Auflage. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006

{5} Terrorism and Communications – Countering the Terrorist Information Cycle, Slovakia, April 2005. The document is available from the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism at http://www.ict.org.il/Article.aspx?ID=929 [accessed May 2018].

{6} Per Faxneld. Post-Satanism, Left Hand Paths, and Beyond in The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity, Oxford University Press (2012), p.207.

{7} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.

{8} Senholt, Jacob C. The Sinister Tradition. Conference paper presented at Satanism in the Modern World, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 19-20th of November, 2009. A copy is available at https://www.webcitation.org/6bpiHBIrr [accessed May 2018].

{9} Monette, Connell. Mysticism in the 21st Century. Sirius Academic Press. 2013, p.89.

{10} David Myatt, The Septenary Anados, And The Quest For Lapis Philosophicus, in A Modern Mysterium: The Enigma of Myatt And The O9A. e-text 2018. A gratis open access copy is available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/myattian-mysterium-v5.pdf [accessed May 2018].

{11} Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen (editors), The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012. p.269.

{12} Jeff Wells, Rigorous Intuition blog, August 2005.

{13} David Myatt: Agent Provocateur? e-text, 2009. Available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/agent-provocateur/ [accessed May 2018].

{14} Kaplan, Jeffrey. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. p. 216ff; p.512f

{15} Myatt, David. Myngath. Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life. CreateSpace, 2013. ISBN 9781484110744

{16} Primary sources in regard to Myatt’s life would include original documentation relating to his neo-nazi decades (such as criminal proceedings, police interviews), and documentation relating to his decade as a Muslim and his time as a Christian monk.

{17} Primary currently accessible sources regarding both his life and writings include the following post-2011 published works:

° The Numinous Way of Pathei-Mathos.
° Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination.
° Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos.
° Myngath.
° One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods.
° Sarigthersa.
° One Exquisite Silence: Some Autobiographical Poems.
° Such Respectful Wordful Offerings: Selected Essays Of David Myatt.

All the above works, and others, are available as gratis open access (pdf) documents from https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2018/03/09/david-myatt-opera-omnia/ [Accessed May 2018].

{18} Myatt, David. The Logical Fallacy of Incomplete Evidence – A Case Study, in A Matter Of Honour, 2013, e-text. Available at https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/about/a-matter-of-honour-2/ [accessed May 2018].

{19} Scott, Kerri. The Authority Of Individual Judgment And The Fallacy Of Illicit Transference, in The Peculiar Matter Of Myatt And Long, 2018, e-text. The essay is included in A Modern Mysterium, op.cit.

{20} Scott, Kerri. Another Academic Misinterpretation Of The O9A, 2018, e-text. Available at https://omega9alpha.wordpress.com/2018/04/24/another-academic-misinterpretation/ [accessed May 2018].

{21} An overview of his philosophy of pathei-mathos is given in J.R. Wright & R. Parker, The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt. CreateSpace, 2106. ISBN 978-1523930135.

{22} Myatt, in his A Matter Of Honour, op.cit., describes both those purported autobiographies of “Anton Long” as forgeries. See also (i) R. Parker, Bealuwes Gast: A Study in Forgery, 2014, e-text, available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/bealuwes-gast/ [Accessed May 2018] and (ii) R. Parker, A Skeptic Reviews Diablerie, 2013, e-text, available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/a-sceptics-review-of-diablerie/ [Accessed May 2018].

The thesis regarding Myatt being Anton Long proposed by academic Goodrick-Clark in his 2002 book Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity is based entirely on his assumption that Myatt wrote Diablerie. Goodrick-Clark provided no evidence from primary sources to support his assumption.

That Goodrick-Clark’s book has been cited by others – including some academics – as “proof” of Myatt being Anton Long is an example of those others committing the fallacy of Argumentum ad Verecundiam.

{23} Pathei-Mathos – Genesis of My Unknowing. 2012. The essay is included as an appendix in Myatt’s autobiography Myngath.

{24} Myatt, David. Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination. CreateSpace, 2013. ISBN ISBN 9781484854266.

{25} Myatt, David. Some Questions For DWM, included in One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods. CreateSpace, 2014. ISBN 978-1502396105.

{26} Theoretician of Terror, Searchlight, July 2000.

{27} J.R. Wright & R. Parker, op.cit.


A Modern Mysterium

David Myatt

David Myatt

Editorial Note: The interesting and informative essay presented below is from the Introduction to the “gratis open access” and 87 page book titled A Modern Mysterium: The Enigma of Myatt And The O9A (pdf). The essay summarizes the salient points of the book, containing as the book does essays written in the past few years by various authors, and divided as the book is into three parts.

The first part deals with the O9A; the second details the claim – the allegation – that Myatt is Anton Long; and the third part presents evidence which contradicts or which casts doubt on that allegation. The work therefore allows the reader to form their own opinion of the O9A and of whether or not there is any merit to the claim that the pseudonymous Anton Long was Mr Myatt.

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Introduction, from A Modern Mysterium

As the author of one the essays included in A Modern Mysterium: The Enigma of Myatt And The O9A wrote, the question of whether or not Mr David Myatt is or was “Anton Long” is sui generis insofar as the Order of Nine Angles is concerned. Why? Basically for two reasons.

If he was, then, as several O9A supporters have claimed, his somewhat strange multiform, exeatic, and antinomian, life is a real-life example of not only the practical – ‘sinister’ – ethos of the O9A but also of its core praxis termed the Seven Fold Way, which praxis is a decades-long esoteric and exoteric personal quest for Lapis Philosophicus, for Wisdom.

If he was not, then the O9A remains one modern Occult philosophy among many with little to distinguish it other than perhaps its complexity and its Labyrinthos Mythologicus.

If his life is a practical example of the ‘sinister’ ethos of the O9A – as his decades of practical involvement with political and religious extremism, his support for terrorism, his imprisonment for violence, and his criminal years, might seem to suggest – then it is easy to understand why opponents and critics of the O9A continue to denigrate him, for the documented facts about his life are enough to make Howard Levey – the much vaunted ‘Anton LaVey’, often described as “the founder of modern satanism” – seem, by comparison, just a showman, a charlatan, and a wuss. {1}

In addition, Myatt’s documented intellectualism – as in his Greek translations and commentaries, such as of tractates from the Corpus Hermeticum – make both Levey and the equally vaunted Aquino (of Temple of Set fame) seem to be, by comparison, pretentious pseudo-intellectuals. Unlike those individuals, Myatt has “fluency in the classical languages (Greek and Latin), as well as Arabic” {2} and thus can read primary esoteric, classical, and alchemical sources in their original language whereas they, and most if not all of their followers, have to rely on the translations of others, lacking as they do the erudition of Myatt, an erudition evident in his recent book Tu Es Diaboli Ianua. {3}

The sources used, for example, by Howard Levey – evident in his ‘satanic bible’ and his letters – are populist interpretations of the likes of Nietzsche and Ayn Rand, populist books about psychology, with the anonymous polemic titled Might Is Right much plagiarized. Such sources and populist interpretations are also much in evidence in texts written by Aquino, such as The Crystal Tablet of Set, where populist summaries of philosophies and weltanschauungen, ancient and modern, precede a quite minimalist and vague presentation of ‘satanist’ and/or of Temple of Set ideas. Thus, a chapter on ‘ethics’ consists of 12 pages of populist summaries of the likes of Plato, Hegel, Marx, et al, followed by a meagre few paragraphs concerning good and evil in an occult context, and which paragraphs merely present rather cliched personal opinions, such as that “there is thus no easy answer to the question of whether a given magical act is good or evil” and that “it is up to the magician to determine what judgments – by which judges – will be important”. As befits such pseudo-intellectualism, the references in such texts are often to populist works (such as The Social Contract by Robert Ardrey) just as quotations from such people as Plato are invariably in translations, not by Aquino, but by someone else. In contrast, when Myatt writes of ethics and about ‘good and evil’ in chapter IV – Questions of Good, Evil, Honour, and God – of his 2013 book Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos, he provides passages in Hebrew, Greek, and Arabic, along with his own translations. Similarly, when discussing ethics in his more recent Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos, {4} Myatt provides the relevant Greek texts (such as from the Gospel of John) and his own translations.

It is thus also easy to understand why many supporters of the O9A support the claim that Myatt is Long. For add to his documented exeatic life, to his intellectualism, the fact that he is regarded by academics as “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution” and you have a person who most definitely does seem to fit the profile of what an ONA person is or should be, with his post-2012 ‘philosophy of pathei mathos’ and recent books such as Tu Es Diaboli Ianua and Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos understood as the musings of someone who, after decades of peregrinations and scholarly study, has found Lapis Philosophicus and who is “living the final apprehension”, with that philosophy, such books, and ‘the last writings of Anton Long’ {5} serving

“to illuminate the O9A for what it is and always has been, beyond the rhetoric, beyond the polemics, beyond its Labyrinthos Mythologicus, and beyond the assumptions made by others. That is, it is a living hereditary, evolving, repository of esoteric knowledge; part of which accumulated and accumulating knowledge is a scholarly perspective on ancient hermeticism; another part of which is a practical modern means (for those who might be interested) to achieve Adeptship and beyond; another part of which knowledge concerns a New Aeon and the logos necessary to bring that Aeon into being. Other parts of which are Esoteric Chant and Aeonics; and so on. In addition, this body of esoteric knowledge now also contains the insights of someone who has ventured beyond The Abyss, and which particular insights return us to that pagan knowledge, that ancient wisdom, of the Rounwytha way, which is, for those who follow it, the way of a certain type of knowing and of a certain type of living.” {6}

All of which makes it unnecessary for anyone – by they O9A or otherwise – to ‘hype’ Mr Myatt, for just presenting the documented facts about his life, and drawing attention to his intellectualism, his erudition, is sufficient. That life, that intellectualism, ‘the last writings of Anton Long’, Myatt’s ‘philosophy of pathei mathos’ (understood as a modern manifestation of the O9A way of the Rounwytha) and books such as Tu Es Diaboli Ianua and Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos tell the necessary story.

Which story is of a modern Magus; of someone who has spent all of his adult life – half a century – on an esoteric and an exoteric quest. Since such a quest exemplifies what the search for Lapis Philosophicus, for Gnosis, for Wisdom, is all about it is in the final analysis irrelevant if Myatt was or was not the pseudonymous Anton Long. For such a personal quest is the essence of all genuine Occult philosophies and praxises, beyond the labels – the denotata – we or others assign to them, be such labels Left Hand Path, Right Hand Path, Satanist, or O9A.

Which, at least to me and some others, makes Myatt someone to be admired and – perhaps – emulated by those O9A or otherwise.

June Boyle
2018

{1} Myatt, for example, has convictions and imprisonment for violence, in 1972, after leading a gang of skinheads in a ‘paki-bashing’ incident: documented in court proceedings, prison records, and newspapers. A conviction for leading a gang of thieves in 1974 and being a fence: documented in court proceedings, in police records/interviews, in mainstream newspaper reports.

He was arrested in 1998 for conspiracy to murder: documented in police records (Scotland Yard, the operation was code-named Periphery), documented in custody records at Malvern and Charing Cross police stations. He founded and led the political wing of Combat 18, the NSM, a fact documented by several academics and by mainstream newspaper reports.

He publicly supported bin Laden and the Taliban before and after 9/11: documented by several academics, by proceedings of NATO conferences, by newspaper reports. He travelled to Arab countries and – when it was unpopular and very dangerous to do so, such as after 9/11 – incited Jihad: documented by several academics. His writings justifying suicide attacks were used by ‘terrorist’ groups such as Hamas: documented by several academics, and by proceedings of NATO conferences.

{2} Connell Monette. Mysticism in the 21st Century, Sirius Academic Press, 2013. p.87.

{3} David Myatt. Tu Es Diaboli Ianua: Christianity, The Johannine Weltanschauung, And Presencing The Numinous. 2017. ISBN 978-1982010935.

{4} David Myatt. Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos. 2017. ISBN 978-1979599023.

{5} See Appendix II of the book.

{6} The quotation is from chapter I of Part Two of the book, which chapter is titled David Myatt, The Septenary Anados, And The Quest For Lapis Philosophicus.


Book Review: Western Paganism And Hermeticism

odal3

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Regarding Western Paganism And Hermeticism
(pdf)

The book, available as a gratis open access pdf document, is comprised of nine essays by various authors which deal with or which review David Myatt’s translations of Hermetic texts and his two recent books Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos and Tu Es Diaboli Ianua; plus – as an appendix – a reprint of Myatt’s relevant article Concerning ἀγαθός and νοῦς in the Corpus Hermeticum.

In her Preface, the editor – authoress of one of the essays in the book – succinctly expresses the raison d’etre of those Myatt books and translations of Hermetic texts, and also of the included essays, writing that

“Myatt’s thesis […] is that Western paganism is essentially the classical paganism of Ancient Greece and Rome and represents the ethos of the culture of the West, which ethos the Hebraic religion of Christianity supplanted. It is our view that those translations, the associated commentaries, and such books enable an insight into, and thus the evolution of, Western culture.”

She also quotes from one of those essays – Re-discovering Western Paganism – whose authors wrote that Myatt’s translations of classical and hermetic texts “when studied together enable us to appreciate and understand the classical, pagan, ethos and thence the ethos of the West itself.”

Collectively the essays present a decidedly new view of Western paganism which is contrary to that of Western neopagan revivals (sometimes described as contemporary Western paganism) and which neopagan revivals mostly devolve around ancient named gods and goddesses, such as those of Viking or Germanic mythology or those associated with Celtic legends of ancient Britain and Ireland. In addition, such modern revivals often involve romanticized rituals and ceremonies such as those now associated with the self-described Druids at Stonehenge during Summer Solstice sunrise at Stonehenge.

As the authoress of the eighth essay – A New Pagan Metaphysics – explains, referencing Myatt’s books Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos and Tu Es Diaboli Ianua as well as his essay From Mythoi To Empathy, this new view of Western paganism is an evolution, a move away from perceiving paganism in terms of mythology and legends to a modern philosophical, ethical, and rational understanding of it. This understanding is of καλὸς κἀγαθός – of nobility of personal character – and which Ancient Greek expression, according to Myatt, represents the ethos of not only Greco-Roman culture but also the non-Christian West. As Myatt notes in his Tu Es Diaboli Ianua, it involves

“an awareness and acceptance of one’s civic duties and responsibilities undertaken not because of any personal benefit (omni utilitate) that may result or be expected, and not because an omnipotent deity has, via some written texts, commanded it and will punish a refusal, but because it is the noble, the honourable – the gentlemanly, the lady-like, the human – thing to do.”

The book therefore takes us on a journey to a different – and for many of us to a new – world, far away from the religious attitudes of the old world as evoked, not only by Christianity, but also by neopaganism with its rituals, mythologies, polytheism and – in some manifestations – ‘magical’ spells, charms, and beliefs.

This new world is, as the authoress of the seventh essay – Suffering, Honour, And The Culture Of The West – makes clear, one where personal honour reigns manifesting as it does what is ethical and noble and ineluctably Western.

The book is highly recommended.

Kerri Scott
March 2018


Anachronistic Copyright

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In an interesting but perhaps not unexpected development {1} David Myatt has made several of his works – the most popular ones, according to our research – available under a ‘creative commons’ license which allows for royalty-free commercial publication by others.

The works so licensed are:

° Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos
° Tu Es Diaboli Ianua
° Corpus Hermeticum: Eight Tractates
° The Numinous Way of Pathei-Mathos
° The Gospel According To John: A Translation And Commentary
° The Agamemnon of Aeschylus
° Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos

A not so unexpected development because, according to Myatt himself, he considers “the abstractions denoted by the terms ‘intellectual property’ and ‘copyright’ to be anachronistic.” {2}

Rumour has it that he plans to make other works of his available under the same commercial license. Coincidently – perhaps? – this would bring his works into almost the same category as O9A works all of which are distributed and classified as being “in the public domain”.

RDM Crew
March 2018 ev

{1} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2018/03/09/david-myatt-opera-omnia/

{2} https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2018/03/09/the-numinous-way-of-pathei-mathos/


Western Paganism And Hermeticism, Third Edition

De Vita Coelitus Comparanda

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The third edition of the compilation Regarding Western Paganism And Hermeticism is now available. It includes two additional articles On Native Egyptian Influence In The Corpus Hermeticum, and A New Pagan Metaphysics.

The compilation is of recent articles about Western paganism and hermeticism, indebted as those articles are to Myatt’s translations of texts from the ancient Corpus Hermeticism and his post-2013 writings such as his book Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos. Myatt’s thesis in that book is that Western paganism is essentially the classical paganism of Ancient Greece and Rome and represents the ethos of the culture of the West, which ethos the Hebraic religion of Christianity supplanted. It is our view that those translations, the associated commentaries, and such books enable an insight into, and thus the evolution, of Western culture.

Regarding Western Paganism And Hermeticism
(pdf)

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Contents:

° Preface
° Re-discovering Western Paganism
° An Insight Into Pagan Mysticism
° Regarding Myatt’s Hermetica
° The Divine Pymander
° Myatt’s Monas – A New Translation of Corpus Hermeticum IV
° On Native Egyptian Influence In The Corpus Hermeticum.
° Suffering, Honour, And The Culture Of The West
° A New Pagan Metaphysics

Appendix I – Concerning ἀγαθός and νοῦς in the Corpus Hermeticum
Appendix II – A Review Of Myatt’s ‘Classical Paganism And The Christian Ethos’

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All the articles included in the book were issued under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license, which license allows for both commercial and non-commercial republication under the terms of that license.


Image credit:

The beginning of the twenty-sixth chapter of the book De Vita Coelitus Comparanda by Marsilii Ficini published in 1489 CE. Quomodo per inferiora superioribus exposita deducantur superiora, et per mundanas materias mundana potissimum dona. [How, when what is lower is touched by what is higher, the higher is cosmically presenced therein and thus gifted because cosmically aligned.]


Reading Myngath

David Myatt

David Myatt

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Reading Myngath
The Apologia of David Myatt

If the reader of Myngath expects a conventional autobiography then they will be either disappointed or consider the work somewhat bizarre.

Many – perhaps most – autobiographies appear to be consciously crafted in order to project, through the medium of words, a particular image of the author and an image which appears to be consistent because past events in the life of the author are often made to appear as if they were the genesis of, or support, what the authors want the reader to believe about who they are and why they have done what they have and/or now have the beliefs or the opinions that they do.

The lives, however, of most notable individuals are not so simple as many of them would like us – via such self-penned deliberate, cause-and-effect, narratives – to believe.

In the case of Myatt what we get is – as the sub-title of Myngath and the introductory brief Apologia inform us – “some recollections of a wyrdful and extremist life” which were a “concise aural recollection to a friend, recorded and then transcribed” and which conciseness was because, according to Myatt “it is the essence of this particular life, recalled, that in my fallible view is or rather may be instructive, and I have tried to present this essence in a truthful way and thus be honest about my failings, my mistakes, my past activities, and my feelings at the time.”

The important phrases here are “aural recollection”, “some recollections”, and “honest about my feelings at the time.” For Myngath is a brief explanation, hastily given to someone (and probably edited by Myatt before publication), of how Myatt himself felt at certain times of his life, how he believes he finally came to reject the extremism that dominated his adult life and develop his philosophy of pathei-mathos.

Which explanation is also an apology for both his extremist deeds and the selfishness so evident in his recollections of his private life. Which may explain why he chose a brief Apologia in preference to a lengthy Introduction; why he inserts some of his poems into the text, and why he added three appendices; with the poems for example expressing his feelings in a way that a wordy explanation might not.

What all this amounts to is that Myngath is not an ordinary autobiography but rather a series of impressions of Myatt at various times in his life. The enthusiastic unconventional schoolboy; a rather naive teenager getting involved in right-wing politics; the violent fanatic setting up a criminal gang to fund a political cause; the rather amoral convict running rackets from his prison cell; the selfish lover; the romantic dreamer and poet; the rather boyish somewhat mischievous Catholic monk; and the extremist turned humanist philosopher for whom “a shared, a loyal, love between two people is the most beautiful, the most numinous, the most valuable thing of all.”

The impression that emerges was succinctly expressed a few years ago by an academic: an impression of an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual.” {1}

Understood as a series of impressions of the life of an individual with rather interesting and diverse experiences – from childhood on – Myngath is a worthwhile read, if only because it places the opinions of so many others about Myatt, from anti-fascists to journalists to various academics, into perspective as being very simplistic. For such a complex man with such a diversity of experiences cannot be so easily pigeon-holed and as two-dimensional as they have made him and make him out to be.

Myngath was, for me, also somewhat annoying, in that beneficial way that annoyance can sometimes be, since it intrigued me sufficiently to read more of David Myatt’s later (post-2011) writings and left me wanting to find a well-researched, objective, and detailed biography of him. The writings were easy to find, but such a biography has yet to be written.

J.B.
July 2016
(Revised 2017)

Myngath is available
(i) as a pdf document from Myatt’s weblog: https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/myngath-2/
and (ii) as a printed book published in 2013, ISBN 978-1484110744

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{1} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.