David Myatt

David Myatt

Editorial Note. Republished here is an archive item by David Myatt, originally published on his blog, and dating from the early part of 2010. That is, before he refined his ‘numinous way’ into his philosophy of pathei-mathos, writing as he did in his 2012 article The Development Of The Numinous Way, that

{quote}

Given that the essence of The Numinous Way is individual empathy, an individual understanding, the development of an individual judgement, and the living of an ethical way of life where there is an appreciation of the numinous, the more I reflected upon this ‘numinous way’ between 2011 and Spring 2012, the more I not only realized my mistakes, but also that it was necessary to remove, to excise, the detritus that had accumulated around the basic insights and the personal pathei-mathos that inspired me to develope that ‘numinous way’. Mistakes and detritus because for some time, during the development of that ‘numinous way’, I was still in thrall to some abstractions, still thinking in terms of categories and opposites, and still fond of pontificating and generalizing, especially about The State. I therefore began to re-express, in a more philosophical manner, the personal, the individual, the ontological, the ethical and spiritual nature, of The Numinous Way, and thus emphasized the virtues of humility, love, and of wu-wei – of balance, of tolerance, of non-interference, of individual interior (spiritual) reformation, of non-striving, of admitting one’s own uncertitude of understanding and of knowing.

The year-long (2011-2012) process of refinement, correction, and reflexion resulted in me re-naming what remained of my ‘numinous way’ the philosophy of pathei-mathos.

{/quote}

Given the topics covered by Myatt in his reply we feel it will be of interest to our readers even though it is dated and therefore probably does not represent Myatt’s current views on the topics in question.

RS,
2017


The following extracts are from my correspondence, in the Spring of 2010 CE, with a young Western gnostic residing, at the time, in India. I have slightly revised the text in order to correct typos and, in a few place, to clarify the meaning.

Toward Understanding The Numinous

I was most interested to receive your reply, since it seems that both you and I have been on somewhat similar quests among the Ways of Life of this world.

You wrote that:
“Political action without the element of the sacred seems futile to me (or at least doomed to failure).”

Something I certainly agree with – and what attracted me, at quite a young age, to NS was that I felt there was something numinous about the life, and the NS, of Adolf Hitler. Many years ago, now, I had the wonderful fortune to meet someone who knew him personally, and he – and another comrade of his (also a personal friend of The Chief) – amply confirmed my initial intuition.

But what I, in my youthful arrogance, failed to understand was that, essentially, National-Socialism was Adolf Hitler – as those two individuals told me, and it was only after several decades of fighting for NS, that I gradually came to realize my error. Which was that my [political] attempt – and all such attempts – to revive NS were doomed because they lacked the numinous, which numinous had to be, for our still unenlightened times, embodied in a living person. Hence, I suppose, my mythos of Vindex: an attempt (perhaps a vain one) to prefigure a new charismatic leader who might, by his (or her) very life presence the numinous, in the modern world, and possibly by the medium, the causal form, of politics.

Yet I have also come to understand that AH may have made some mistakes, through elevating a particular abstraction over and above the numinous, and through occasionally striving to make real his vision by using certain un-numinous – that is, dishonourable – means, such as modern impersonal warfare.

You wrote:
“do you still consider yourself to be a Muslim?”

Possibly, but only in the sense that I understand authentic Islam as an apprehension, one presencing, of the numinous, in our dishonourable times; and in the sense that being Muslim means (at least according to my rather limited understanding) acknowledging our human fallibility before, and dependence and reliance upon, The One, named Allah (as we are but mortal travellers in the realm of the causal).

This, perhaps, is veering toward a rather Sufi-esque view, where there is the understanding of how various Ways may also be, or can sometimes be, a path, a Way, toward The One.

Again, I was perhaps fortunate in having been able to spend some time in the Middle East and Iran, talking to Muslims, both Shia and Sunni, and especially during one trip in Egypt into the desert where I felt I came close to feeling and understanding the simple beauty, the numinous purity, behind the label “Islam” which as been assigned to that Way – a simple beauty, a purity, I had also felt during my time as a Christian monk.

You wrote:
“I’m still very much interested in NS and Islam, however, as well as the Numinous Way”

What I have called The Numinous Way are simply my own tentative answers to questions which have perplexed me for decades, and/or which I have been seeking answers to, as well as being the result of my learning from my errors, my mistakes, my arrogance. I am quite aware that my answers, my conclusions, may be incorrect or somehow incomplete, and that they are not, nor can ever be, definitive, or even adequately describe our (and my own) apprehension of the numinous.

In a sense, I seem to have found something lacking in all the many and various Ways I have experienced and lived, over the decades; found myself in some way or other dissatisfied with the answers which seem to have accumulated around such Ways over the centuries.

Thus my Numinous Way is just my own perspective, my own view, of the numinous, and does not seem to me to necessarily contradict the essence of many other Ways, when such Ways are considered sans dogma, sans the abstractions, they have acquired over the centuries.

So, for the moment, at least, I am reasonably happy with such personal answers of mine, which answers seem to have taken me to what appears to be the essence behind many Ways, such that, in one sense, I am (and yet am not) Muslim, and Catholic, and Taoist, and pagan, and Buddhist, and so on. Such terms – such -isms – just seem to get in the way of living one’s life in a numinous, empathic, manner.

You wrote:
aspects of [life here] can be difficult for a Westerner to adjust to…

In many if not most ways your experiences there [in India] seem to be the opposite of mine in Muslim lands. When I lived for a while in the Middle East – and whenever I travelled to such lands – I found acceptance and friendship. Indeed, sometimes, I found it rather overwhelming and occasionally embarrassing – still having something of an archetypal old-fashioned English demeanour. For instance, I can remember on many occasions going into a Mosque somewhere (almost always the only White person there) and being greeted with genuine warmth and asked to sit in the front row for Namaz (a position of honour normally) and afterwards being invited into people’s homes.

You wrote:
If I’ve understood your notion of the numinous correctly, then I believe you’d agree that the problem with the Right is that it keeps trying to put abstraction in front of the Real

Certainly – and this means a rejection of all conventional politics. It seems to me that the solution is two-fold. First, that one has to go beyond the old, un-numinous, abstraction of the nation-State, and instead establish new communities based upon tribes and clans and thus upon a new, emerging, living – numinous – tradition. Second, that one has to make personal honour not only one of the foundations of one’s own life, but also the only basis for the ethics of, and law and justice in, such new communities.

My understanding of a living tradition is that it arises naturally from a small community or some collection of such small communities, with the individuals often bound together by bonds of kinship and the sharing of toil and of hardship overcome. These individuals dwell in a specific area which they have an affinity to and which provides them with sustenance and a means of living. That is, there is a direct and necessary relationship to the land, to Nature, in a specific, small, local area.

Personally, I do not believe that it is possible to resurrect, and certainly undesirable to try and resurrect, some dead tradition, even if it be of one’s ancestors, one’s own folk. Rather, one has to plant the seeds of a new numinous tradition and nurture the growth of that tradition.

Having spent a great deal of my adult life living and working in the English countryside, and having some experience of politics and religions, I am acutely aware of what native Europeans have not only lost but also need to acquire, and develope.

What has been lost – in the pursuit of materialism, through technology, and an increasing urbanization – is that numinous connexion to Nature, to a certain small area which we personally know and where we dwell, and a living in a way we are not bound by the modern abstraction of Time or swayed and manipulated by abstractions in general (and politics and all un-numinous religions are abstractions), but rather where the horizon of our daily lives and thus our concerns are set by what we know, and those whom we know, personally, directly.

What needs to be acquired and developed is, in effect, a new personality – a new type of human being.

You wrote:
you always write something original, rather than just developing a new synthesis of other men’s words

Well, during my second term of imprisonment I decided that I would henceforward write only about what I personally felt, had experienced, or concluded as the result of my own thinking – mostly because I then perhaps rather arrogantly believed that no one hitherto had fully understood the problem or conceived of a viable solution (relating to the problems of the West) or even answered in a way I found satisfying the fundamental questions about our own existence as human beings.

Prior to this, I had spent almost a decade in reading the views, and answers, the writings, of others – ranging from Homer to TS Eliot, from Aristotle to Nietzsche and Heidegger; from Norse myths to Buddhism to Savitri Devi; and so on.

My early NS writings were mainly derived from my own youthful idealistic vision and my passion to remake my own land into a better, more noble, place, and to counter what then I understood as the machinations, the “social engineering” of the Magian, and others. My writings about Islam were often inspired by what I felt was a certain insidious Western influence so that for example the simple submission and guidance that was Al-Islam came be viewed and understood and re-interpreted through certain Western abstractions, philosophical and political, for even the use and acceptance of the term “religion” by Muslims in relation to their own Way of Life was such an error.

But it took me several decades, in the case of NS and such things as Christianity and Buddhism, and almost a decade in the case of Islam, to acquire the practical experience, the theoretical (academic) knowledge, and thence the direct personal understanding, that led me to form certain conclusions about such forms, ideas, and Ways, and which drew from within me my own, individual, refined and complete, answers to the fundamental questions about our human existence.

In respect of NS, I came to understand that the problem was not the simple “us and them” concept that the biological notion of the folk, the concentration on the machinations of the Jews, and the concept of eternal struggle, created. That is, the belief that we had been somehow led astray, and needed to return to some idealized notion of some past we have lost, to re-connect ourselves with “our true identity” and “purify” our land and folk.

Instead, I concluded that we ourselves – native Europeans – were an integral part of the problem; that it was necessary for us to fundamentally change ourselves, and that this change had to arise from within each one of us, directly, numinously, and could not be achieved by the imposition of or the striving for some political, some social, ideology or by adherence to some pre-existing religious world-view. It certainly could not be achieved by trying to resurrect some dead – and often some idealized – past tradition.

Thus, as you wrote:
the fixation on the biological view of race is one such symptom

In respect of Islam, I came to understand that for all its benefits, for all its intimations of the numinous in this materialistic modern world of ours, it was – had become – an abstraction, which individuals imposed upon themselves and mightily strove to follow and adhere to in the hope of Jannah, and that, and unfortunately, even a desire to return to the perceived, the original, fundamentals – as manifest for instance in the modern awakening that was Ahlus Sunnah wal Jamaah – was not and never could be the numinous, the evolutionary, the ethical, the correct philosophical, answer, just as what one might described as the more natural, the less abstract, the less dogmatic, perhaps the more human, approach of Sufism was not, ultimately, the answer either.

Which answer, for me, is the simple one of empathy, compassion, personal honour, and of ourselves as one nexion, one fragile connexion to all Life, with there being no need for the abstraction of some biological folk, no need for some suffering-caused concept of struggle and dominance, no need to project blame on others for our own failings, no need for assumptions such as Jannah, no need to strive to adhere to some rigid principles or rules laid down by someone else in some past. Instead, there is a being-human in a natural way – a knowing of each moment of life in its immediate personal reality (sans abstractions), and a gentle acceptance of just living empathically, honourably, within that immediate and personal reality.

Philosophically, this is the knowledge that our life – our conscious human life which we possess the ability, the faculties, to change – is no longer and of necessity bound to what Heraclitus described as polemos; to some interminable dialectic of conflict and thence to some abstraction, some ideal, some linear concept, named “progress”. The knowledge that one of the most common causes of suffering – and of the loss of the numinous, in our lives – is the assumption of linearity, of causal Time (linear cause-and-effect), implicit in all our human manufactured abstractions, and which abstractions we impose upon ourselves, which we project onto and impose on other human beings, and on the life with which we share this planet.

David Myatt
May 2010


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A Delightful Place To Be

In many ways, England at this time of year – around mid-Spring – is a delightful place to be, for there are Spring flowers, hedgerows in bloom, trees coming into leaf; the burgeoning Dawn Chorus, and quite often warmer and sunnier days heralding perhaps another Summer of dreams to be remembered, happily remembered, as the dark longer nights and the cold of Winter return as they return and we – perhaps with family, partner, friends – hunker ourselves down to await such warmer days, again.

Such simple delights, of such a childful joy; delights and a simplicity that I personally have come to value more and more as pathei-mathos and increasing age has slowed me in both body and thought, bringing – it seems – a certain repose, certainly a need for personal humility, for expiation, and certainly a feeling concerning, another intimation of, what for us humans is most valuable, most human, and possibly should be most desired. Which is the joy of a personal love shared; the companionship of family, friends; and that simple quite humble way of living arising when our life is just our and their life, when our concerns just our and their concerns, when our hopes and dreams are just our and their hopes; the life, the concerns, the hopes, the dreams, of those whom we love, we trust, and with whom we share the passing of our daily lives.

For decades I – flawed, hubriatic, dissatisfied, often angry, and often inclined toward violence – rejected such manifestations of our humanity as I pursued one and then another suffering-causing agenda; as I – extremist activist, agitator – stupidly arrogantly placed some abstraction, some ideal, some ideology, before personal love, before compassion, before empathy, before kindness, before family, before wu- wei. And it was during those four decades of hubris that I scribbled away, writing thousands and thousands of pages – propaganda, essays, ideological tracts, pamphlets – in praise of and trying to justify the extremisms I upheld and fought for. Worse, I not only supported violence and propagated hatred but pridefully, temerariously, saught to revise some abstractions and manufacture new abstractions in my attempts to motivate and inspire others and bring closer the downfall of ‘the system’ I then so disliked in the hope that some revolution, some violent struggle or other, might somehow and in some miraculous way bring into being a ‘new world’ founded on some ideological ideal and which ideal was always harsh and always founded on prejudice and intolerance, on some divisive division between ‘them’ and ‘us’. In the process, of course, I caused suffering. To loved ones, to family, to friends, and to others; to so many others, known or personally unknown to me. As I wrote earlier this year:

“I have no excuses; the failure of decades was mine. A failure of compassion, empathy, honour. A failure as a human being. There are no excuses for my past, for deeds such as mine. No excuses for selfishness, for a hubris of personal emotion. No excuse for deceit, deception, lies. No excuse for extremism, for racism, for the politics, the religion, of hate […]

I would like to believe – to hope – that this [my] personal, this interior, change, possibly evident in some recent writings of mine, and possibly also evident in my [philosophy of pathei-mathos] is positive, good; in some way counter-balances the hubris of my past, and is thereby some expiation, some propitiation, for at least some of the suffering caused. But it is for others, not for me, to judge whether that is so.” [1]

David Myatt
2nd April 2012

[1] The quotations are from the compilation of essays and letters entitled Meditations on Extremism, Remorse, and The Numinosity of Love.


Image credit: The Day’s Consecration by Richard Moult

David Myatt

David Myatt

The pdf file below contains Myatt’s fourteen page essay Exegesis and Translation, first published in 2013. In the essay Myatt asks pertinent questions about revealed religions and the reliance the majority of believers of such revelations have on translations of their ‘sacred texts’ and the exegesis of others, writing in one memorable passage how

“there seems to be, in revealed religions and most conventional spiritual ways, a rejection of pathei-mathos in favour of the wisdom said to be contained in the texts and thus in the teachings of the founder(s) of the religion/spiritual way, and – in the case of revealed religions – in the writings/edicts of those who have been vested with or who have acquired a certain religious authority, and – also in the case of revealed religions – how such pathei-mathos, to be accepted at all, has to be judged by criteria developed from such texts and/or developed from interpretations of such texts.”

This essay therefore has relevance to Myatt’s philosophy of pathei mathos. It reveals also Myatt’s erudition, with quotations in their original language from the New Testament, the Koran, and Boethius – together with Myatt’s translations – as well as quotations from Beowulf, John Gower, and Morte Arthure.

While Myatt incorporated parts of the essay into some of his book-length works – for instance part of the Translation and Al-Quran section of the essay was added to the appendix of his Poemandres translation {1} – it is informative to read the complete essay, with his comments under the Ontology, Exegesis, and Pathei-Mathos heading in Part One of particular interest.

Exegesis And Translation
(pdf)

 

°°°

{1} David Myatt. Poemandres, A Translation and Commentary. Third Edition, 2014. ISBN 978-1495470684.


 

odal3

Below is a link to a pdf edition of David Myatt’s seminal National Socialist text Vindex: The Destiny Of The West, a text first published and printed in 1984 in the USA by George Dietz.

This pdf edition was produced some years ago by a member of an Australian ONA nexion, who added a few footnotes to the text and an essay at the end. While the transcriber introduced a few typos into the text, these – and his few footnotes and end essay – do not detract from its value: from the fact that, to date, it is still the only publicly available edition of Myatt’s text, with rare secondhand copies of the 1984 printed edition fetching high prices when they come up for sale, and thus kudos is due to the person who transcribed the printed text and produced this pdf version.

Vindex: Destiny of The West
(pdf)

Botticelli-Madonna-del-Magnificat-3

Editorial Note: The following extract is from Myatt’s 2012 essay Fifty Years Of Diverse Peregrinations and which essay he included in his 2013 book Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos: Essays and Letters Regarding Spirituality, Humility, and A Learning From Grief available as that book is both as a free e-text (myatt-religion-and-pathei-mathos.pdf ) and as a printed book, ISBN 9781484097984.

°°°

In fifty years of diverse peregrinations – which included forty years of practical involvement with various religions and spiritual ways, practical involvement with extremisms both political and religious, and some seven years of intense interior reflexion occasioned by a personal tragedy – I have come to appreciate and to admire what the various religions and the diverse spiritual ways have given to us over some three thousand years.

Thus have I sensed that our world is, and has been, a better place because of them and that we, as a sentient species, are en masse better because of them. Thus it is that I personally – even though I have developed my own non-religious weltanschauung – have a great respect for religions such as Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Sikhism; for spiritual ways such as Buddhism, Taoism; for older paganisms such as (i) θεοί and Μοῖραι τρίμορφοι μνήμονές τ᾽ Ἐρινύες, and (ii) άγνωστος θεός, and for the slowly evolving more recent paganisms evident for instance in a spiritual concern for the welfare of our planet and for the suffering we have for so long inflicted on other humans and on the other life with which we share this planet.

Unsurprisingly, therefore, I disagree with those who, often intemperate in words or deeds – or both – disrespectfully fail to appreciate such religions and spiritual ways and the treasure, the culture, the pathei-mathos, that they offer, concentrating as such intemperate people so often do on what they perceive to be or feel to be are the flaws, the mistakes, of such religions and such spiritual ways while so often ignoring (as such people tend to do) their own personal flaws, their own mistakes, as well as the reality that it is we humans beings – with our ὕβρις, with our lack of humility, our lack of appreciation for the numinous, and with our intolerance and our often arrogant and harsh interpretations of such religions – who have been the cause and who continue to be the cause of such suffering as has blighted and as still blights this world.

As Heraclitus mentioned over two thousand years ago:

ὕβριν χρὴ σβεννύναι μᾶλλον ἢ πυρκαϊὴν 

Better to deal with your hubris before you confront that fire

David Myatt
2012


David Myatt

David Myatt: National Socialist Essays
(Volume 1, pdf)

As an academic noted in an article – published in 2013 by the United States Air Force – David Myatt is “arguably England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution.” [1]

It seems therefore apposite for us to offer this volume: the first in a projected series of documents containing a few of the hundreds of National Socialist essays of David Myatt dating from the middle to late 1990s, essays which were not included in the recent [April 2016] pdf collection we released titled Selected National Socialist Writings Of David Myatt.

Where that collection concentrated on Myatt’s more philosophical and ideological NS writings – his revisionist vision and evolution of National Socialism – this series will concentrate on his more overtly political writings; the type of writings published for instance in his newsletter The National- Socialist – whose banner was ‘Propaganda Without A Fist To Back It Up Is Useless’ – and which newsletter was initially issued (from 1995 on) in support of Combat 18, and later (from 1997 on) in support of his own political organization The National-Socialist Movement, of which the London nail-bomber David Copeland was a member.

The re-publication of these essays, as with Selected National Socialist Writings Of David Myatt and the Constitution of The National-Socialist Reich, should provide suitable source material for those researching, studying, or interested in, either contemporary neo-nazi ideology and ‘right-wing’ extremism and/or the life and past extremism of Mr Myatt. What is also of interest is how Myatt’s political strategy evolved over time: from supporting covert insurrection and ‘terrorism’ in pursuit of overthrowing the government to – via pathei mathos – the ethical National Socialism of Reichsfolk.

RDM Crew
May 2016

[1] Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (USAF), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.


odal3

This is the first publication of the complete edition of David Myatt’s text The Mythos of Vindex, although various and sometimes substantial extracts from it have been published over the years. Written between 1998 and 1999, with some parts revised by Myatt between 2002 and 2005, it expands upon, refines, and develops the themes he wrote about in his 1984 pamphlet Vindex: Destiny of The West.

The Mythos Of Vindex
(pdf)


Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Todos los textos aquí presentados fueron escritos originalmente por David Myatt, un antiguo teórico y activista Nacionalsocialista, con años de militancia en diversos grupos, afines al Hitlerismo Esotérico, el Nacionalsocialismo y el racialismo identitario blanco, de la talla de la Orden de los Nueve Ángulos, el Movimiento Nacional Socialista del Reino Unido, Reichsfolk y Combat 18, entre otros. David Myatt es uno de los teóricos contemporáneos más reconocidos del movimiento NS moderno, con una cantidad impresionante de textos sobre la materia, aunque actualmente es usado como referencia histórica, ya que en años recientes, Myatt abandonó y desconoció sus trabajos sobre el tema, apostando por una nueva filosofía personal que desarrolló bajo el nombre de “Filosofía de Pathei-Mathos”.

Cabe mencionar que David Myatt se alejó del espectro Nacionalsocialista y abrazó completamente el Islam en 1998, después de estudiarlo durante un tiempo y encontrar afinidades con la lucha NS contra el Marxismo, el Capitalismo y el Sionismo, y entender la Yihad práctica de los musulmanes como una de las muy pocas verdaderas acciones de activismo en el mundo contra estos males y sus patrocinadores, así como comprender que el Islam es una religión que ensalza el honor, la lealtad, la razón y el respeto, entre otras cosas, justo como lo hace la cosmovisión tradicional Nacionalsocialista, a la cual se había adherido durante décadas.

Puede decirse que Myatt es una pieza clave dentro de la doctrina NS dirigida a las generaciones post-NSDAP, pues sus obras escritas son muy bien recibidas en el mundo NS de habla inglesa. Además, también se considera que Myatt -o Abdul-Aziz Ibn Myatt, después de convertirse al Islam-, es quien más ha contribuido a crear una síntesis y un entendimiento entre quienes se dicen Nacionalsocialistas, y los musulmanes.

Al hacer una lectura biográfica de David Myatt, uno puede encontrar que no se trata del típico militante Nacionalsocialista, ni del típico teórico islámico. De hecho, algo de lo que más ha causado controversia en torno a la figura de Myatt, es que su “búsqueda por el sentido definitivo de la vida”, lo llevó a ser monje cristiano, budista, taoísta, pagano y finalmente musulmán, sin omitir su paso por el activismo pro-NS. Por ello, Myatt ha llegado a ser visto como alguien inestable, que fue “cambiando de bando” una y otra vez con el paso de los años, hasta llegar a ser, finalmente, una especie de pacifista, rechazador del “extremismo” y la violencia en cualquiera de sus formas, con su propia visión del mundo y de la vida.

Pero cabe aclarar, que Myatt terminó rechazando el aspecto racialista del Nacionalsocialismo y el “extremismo” del “Islam radical” sólo después de sufrir un grave shock que lo llevaría a “reevaluar” su vida y todo lo que había hecho durante ella.

Y es que la vida personal de David Myatt no fue nada fácil, y al menos en una ocasión anterior se supo de un shock emocional suyo: En 1990, cuando se acababa de mudar a Malvern, para vivir y trabajar, Myatt destruyó sus copias personales de la poesía que había escrito (Myatt también es poeta), calificándolos de “autoindulgentes y decadentes”, añadiendo que “la vida personal está muerta”, expresando finalmente, su deseo (que no cumplió) de no escribir poesía de nuevo.

Este episodio, de acuerdo con JR Wright -la biógrafa de Myatt-, pudo haber sido el resultado de la muerte de su segunda esposa, a causa del cáncer, cuando tenía sólo 39 años de edad, siendo su primer matrimonio un fracaso, después de que su pareja se fugara con una mujer más joven.

Sin embargo, el shock que en este caso nos interesa, y que llevó a este personaje a “reevaluar” su vida y alejarse del Islam definitivamente, fue el suicidio de su prometida Francine, en 2006.

David Myatt ha aceptado abiertamente que este suceso cambió radicalmente su concepción de la vida, llevándolo incluso a un punto muy fuerte de inestabilidad emocional. Por ejemplo, una de las primeras cosas que hizo Myatt, poco después del suicidio de su prometida, fue ir a la iglesia católica más cercana, a encender una vela -a su nombre- en la Capilla de la Virgen María, aun cuando sabía que seguía siendo musulmán y que lo esperado, era ir a una Mezquita o hacer una súplica a Allah.

Así, el suicidio de Francine, llevaría a nuestro personaje a una reflexión de aproximadamente 3 años, durante los cuales se seguiría mostrando como musulmán, aunque esto cambiaría en 2010, cuando Myatt anuncia haber abandonado el Islam, para centrarse exclusivamente en su personal “Filosofía de Pathei-Mathos”.

Si bien la vida de David Myatt dio giros radicales una y otra vez -sobre todo, por cuestiones profundamente emocionales y de gran impacto-, es de reconocer que sus obras, tanto en el ámbito Nacionalsocialista, como en el Islámico, son un referente de gran calidad para quienes desean conocer la más vasta teoría condensada entre el NS y el Islam, creada de la mano de quien fuera uno de los Nacionalsocialistas más importantes del Reino Unido, y después, uno de los musulmanes fundamentalistas más conocidos en el mundo occidental, no sólo por su defensa de la Yihad antisionista, sino por la magnificencia de su obra escrita, en apoyo a un Islam puro, el establecimiento de un Califato, y la gobernanza de la Shariah.

Nosotros rescatamos una pequeña parte de sus textos -ya escritos como musulmán y dirigidos para Nacionalsocialistas y afines- y los compartimos (aun sabiendo que el propio autor se deslinda actualmente de ellos, en pos de su inclinación pacifista) simplemente porque forman la mejor contribución en el tema que alguien haya podido dar jamás.

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Editorial Note: Myatt’s National-Socialist Guide To Islam is available as a pdf document here:  ns-guide-islam.pdf


Article source:
http://guerra-de-civilizaciones.blogspot.com/2016/05/la-guia-nacionalsocialista-para.html


Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Editorial Note:
Below is a link to a pdf version of David Myatt’s 2012 text In Explanation Of Humility and The Need for Tolerance: With Reference to Islam, which text – as he explains – is taken “from a reply sent, in November of 2012, to a personal correspondent living in America who enquired about my peregrinations among various religions; about why – as mentioned in previous correspondence – I still respected the Muslim way of life; and about my response to the particular criticism that Islam encourages terrorism.”

Four years on, the text is even more relevant given the continuing (sometimes violent) anti-Muslim sentiment that pervades certain sections of societies in Europe, Britain, and America. In 2013, Myatt would incorporate a revised version of parts of the text into the Questions of Good, Evil, Honour, and God section of his book Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos.

°°°°°
With Reference To Islam
(pdf)

Editorial Note: We reproduce here a 2010 article by David Myatt (revised by him in January 2011) and which article – about his ‘numinous way’ – was one of the many he, post-2012, rejected when he evolved that ‘numinous way’ into his ‘philosophy of pathei-mathos’. In a 2014 note titled ‘Disclaimer’ he wrote: {quote} I reject and disown all my pre-2011 writings and effusions, with the exception of my Greek translations, the poetry included in the published collection ‘One Exquisite Silence’ (ISBN 978-1484179932), some private letters written between 2002 and 2011, and those few items about my since much revised ‘numinous way’ which are included in post-2012 publications such as ‘The Numinous Way of Pathei-Mathos’ (ISBN 978-1484096642). {/quote}

The reason for his rejection of this Introduction to the Philosophy of The Numen article seems inscrutable to us, given that it raises some interesting points which as far we know he has not subsequently returned to and given that – at least to us – it does not, with one exception, seem to conflict with his post-2012 writings about his ‘philosophy of pathei-mathos’. That exception is his paragraphs about democracy and ‘the state’ in footnote 7. Whatever the reason for its rejection, it reveals something about the evolution of his thought; an evolution he wrote about in his 2012 essay The Development of the Numinous Way.


The Philosophy of The Numen
(pdf)