David Myatt And The Jews

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt

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The following extract from an article published in January 2019 in the prestigious academic journal Studies in Conflict & Terrorism provides an interesting analysis of Myatt’s move from National Socialism to Islam.

Add to this analysis the fact of Myatt’s life-long belief that the Shoah is a modern myth and it is not surprising that he was and still is hated, reviled and the target of false, malicious and libellous allegations by Zionists, by anti-fascists, by Establishment journalists, and by others.

RDM Crew
June 2019

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Myatt eventually lost hope in the far right’s ability to combat Zionism […] He explained that he now believed there would never be a successful uprising “in any Western nation, by nationalists, racial nationalists, or National Socialists because these people lack the desire, the motivation, the ethos, to do this and because they do not have the support of even a large minority of their own folk.”

This disillusion contributed to Myatt’s turn to Islam. [He] drew a straight-line connection between his fight against the Jewish people as a neo-Nazi and as a Muslim.

Much of Myatt’s public writing during his time as a Muslim focused on encouraging enemies of the Jewish people to unite under a single banner. He exhorted “all enemies of the Zionists to embrace the Jihad,” referred to Islam as the “true martial religion,” and claimed that it “will most effectively fight against the Jews and the Americans.” Myatt praised Osama bin Laden, describing the al-Qaeda leader as “an exemplary warrior who has forsaken a life of luxury to pursue his Islamic duty.”

[The] thrust of his argument [was] that “the primary battle against the Zionist occupation government (ZOG) has shifted from the West to the Islamic world.”

Myatt provides an example of how one’s commitment to anti-Semitism can bridge the ideological divide between Nazism and jihadism.

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Source: Daveed Gartenstein-Ross & Madeleine Blackman (2019). Fluidity of the Fringes: Prior Extremist Involvement as a Radicalization Pathway. Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. Taylor & Francis. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1057610X.2018.1531545

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