Myatt And The Zeitgeist Of The Modern West

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David Myatt

Myatt And The Zeitgeist Of The Modern West

A recent (January 2019) mention of David Myatt in an academic journal in connection with terrorism {1} is another reminder of not only how the life of Myatt is compartmentalized by others but also how denotata is used and sometimes invented and leads to a simplistic portrayal of a person and thus to a lack of understanding of their physis, their character, and – sometimes – to the dehumanization of the person because what is described by the denotatum or denotata is considered to be “bad” or “evil” or morally reprehensible as in the case of what modern Western governments and the mainstream Media describe by the denotatum “nazi”.

In terms of compartmentalizing the life of Myatt, some people as in the aforementioned article consider him an example of political and/or of religious “extremism”. Others – based on the assumption he is a certain “Anton Long” of Order of Nine Angles fame – consider him an example of a modern ‘satanist’ with some going so far as to express the view that Myatt’s decades of extremism is an example of what the satanism of the Order of Nine Angles means and implies.

In terms of how denotata is used and sometimes invented, the aforementioned article provides a relevant example, for the authors have invented a new category, “fringe fluidity”, which they describe as “a distinct radicalization pathway” and which they give Myatt as an example of. In addition, they claim that such “fringe fluidity” explains the beliefs and actions of such extremists and terrorists.

Those familiar with Myatt’s philosophy of pathei-mathos {2} will appreciate why applying denotata – abstractions – to describe and “explain” a person or persons or an entity is a fundamental philosophical error. For according to Myatt such denotata always relate to a dialectic of opposites and obscure the physis of beings. In his 2015 essay Personal Reflexions On Some Metaphysical Questions he writes that formulating a question

“in such terms – [as] causal/acausal; whole/parts; eternal/temporal; ipseity/unity; emergent from/genesis of – is a mis-apprehension of what-is because such denoting is ‘us as observer’ (i) positing, as Plato did, such things as a theory regarding ‘the ideal’, and/or (ii) constructing a form or abstraction (ἰδέᾳ) which we then presume to project onto what is assumed to be ‘external’ to us, both of which present us with only an illusion of understanding and meaning because implicit in such theories and in all such constructed forms are (i) an opposite (an ‘other’) and (ii) the potentiality for discord (dialectical or otherwise) between such opposites and/or because of a pursuit of what is regarded as ‘the ideal’ of some-thing.”

In the case of Myatt, the prevalent denotata used to describe him, by academics and others, is based on (i) ignoring or on ignorance of important aspects of his life such as his time as a Catholic monk, his time as a vagabond, his work as a farm labourer and as a gardener, his now reclusive life-style; (ii) ignoring or an ignorance of his post-2012 writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos; (iii) ignoring or an ignorance of his poetry; and (iv) ignoring or an ignorance of his translations of and commentaries on tracts from the Corpus Hermeticum as well his translations of the likes of Aeschylus, Sappho, Sophocles, and his iconoclastic translation of chapters from the Gospel of John.

That his Greek translations, and his writings about his philosophy of pathei-mathos – rooted as his philosophy is in the Western philosophical tradition – are in quantity far greater than his political or “Jihadi” polemics seems to have escaped the notice of academics and others.

This neglect of Myatt’s philosophical writings and translations and poetry, and neglect of his reclusive mystical life since 2010, results in and has resulted in bias, in a prejudice toward him; and a bias and a prejudice that is perhaps natural given the zeitgeist of the modern West, born as that zeitgeist was in the Allied victory in the Second World War with the subsequent demonization of German National Socialism and the acceptance of the dogma of “racial equality” and of the myth of the Shoah.

That not one academic, and not one critic of Myatt – be such a critic an “anti-fascist” or some self-described ‘satanist’ or Occultist – has penned a scholarly analysis of Myatt’s philosophical writings, of his Greek translations, or of his poetry, is indicative, and seems to suggest how such academics, such Myattian critics, are not only in thrall to the zeitgeist of the modern West, but are unable or unwilling to free themselves from the tyranny of denotata with the dehumanization that inevitably results when such denotata are applied to individuals.

A thralldom perhaps placed into perspective by two lone academic voices who respectively described Myatt as an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual,” {3} and as having “fluency in the classical languages (Greek and Latin), as well as Arabic and possibly Persian, [and] possessed of a gifted intellect and apparently a polymath.” {4}

That Myatt’s complexity – his physis – remains undiscovered, undocumented, is perhaps also indicative of the zeitgeist of the modern West.

Hence why there are two very different tales of two reformed racists. {5} For Myatt

“seems to have become, to some individuals involved with some sub-cultures (occult and otherwise) not only some sort of iconoclastic anti-Establishment figure but also disliked and reviled by many more individuals around the world who have apparently developed a prejudice against him.” {5}

Haereticus The Younger
Oxonia
2019
v. 1.03

{1} Daveed Gartenstein-Ross & Madeleine Blackman (2019). Fluidity of the Fringes: Prior Extremist Involvement as a Radicalization Pathway. Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. Taylor & Francis.

{2} See The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt (pdf) which provides an overview of Myatt’s philosophy and in which book the terms denotatum and abstraction feature prominently.

{3} Susan Raine. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.

{4} Connell Monette. Mysticism in the 21st Century, Sirius Academic Press, 2013.

{5} https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/two-reformed-racists/

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