Decoding The Life Of Myatt

David Myatt

David Myatt

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Decoding The Life Of Myatt

One of the most common assumptions made about David Myatt – often made and repeated by anonymous persons by means of the internet – is that he has flitted from one cause to another, from one extreme (neo-nazi) to another extreme (radical Islam) and from one religion to another (Catholicism, Buddhism, Islam, Paganism) to end up founding “his own religion”, The Numinous Way.

That those making and repeating such an assumption are ill-informed and/or ignorant, with the assumption itself being prejudicial, is obvious if one studies the life of Myatt in detail.

The first relevant fact is that Myatt was a dedicated National Socialist activist and ideologue for thirty years (1968-1998). That is, for the major part of his adult life, and for a period most probably longer than many of his ‘anonymous internet detractors’ have been alive. This three decade long period of his life led to him being described as “England’s principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution.” {1}

The second relevant fact is that Myatt was a proponent of radical Islam – of Jihad – for ten years (1998-2008) during which decade he spent at least half of it in a campaign to form an alliance between National Socialists and Jihadists {2} so that they could fight what he regarded as their common enemy: Zionists and the Zionist entity that currently occupies Palestine. His campaign led to him being described as “emblematic of the modern syncretism of radical ideologies” {3} and as an “example of the axis between right-wing extremists and Islamists.” {2}{4} At a NATO conference in 2005 it was stated that Myatt, as a Muslim, had called on “all enemies of the Zionists to embrace the Jihad” against Jews and the United States {5}.

The third relevant fact – derived from the previous two – is that Myatt thus spent forty years of his life (1968-2008) actively campaigning against “the same enemy”, namely Jews and Zionists; that is, against what neo-nazis and others have termed ZOG, the Zionist Occupation Government.

Spending forty years of one’s life actively engaged in fighting the same enemy is most certainly not “flitting from one cause to another, from one extreme to another.”

Which decades-long dedication to a particular cause led to one academic writing that

“Even more astonishing than this transition [from neo-nazi to Muslim], is that it seems both his Nazism and Islamism are merely instruments for the ONA’s [Order of Nine Angles] underlying sinister esoteric plots.” {6}

Which brings us to consideration of Myatt’s possible motives; of what his five decades of peregrinations – from 1968 to 2018 – were all about.

The Peregrinations Of Mr Myatt

Myatt’s admittedly strange life has led to speculation about his intent, with one academic – reviewing the book in which the “underlying sinister esoteric plots” quotation occurs – describing Myatt as an “extremely violent, intelligent, dark, and complex individual.” {7}

Over the past ten years the speculation has ranged from (i) the aforementioned “instruments for the ONA’s underlying sinister esoteric plots,” to suggestions that (ii) he is a government agent provocateur, to (iii) him being on a life-long personal Faustian quest perhaps in hope of discovering ‘truth’, to (iv) him as a youthful fanatic who slowly, gradually, over decades learns from his experiences – political, religious, and personal – and thus changing, evolving, as a person.

In the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation he is “Anton Long”, founder of the Occult group the Order of Nine Angles, with his role being “paramount to the whole creation and existence of the ONA” {8} and with his life being regarded by many involved in the Occult sub-culture that is the ONA/O9A {9} as a documented example of the ONA’s Seven Fold Way {10}. Thus, “Myatt’s life-long devotion to various extreme ideologies has been part of a sinister game that is at the heart of the ONA.” {11}

In regard to the “government agent provocateur” interpretation, as Canadian author and satirist Jeff Wells wrote:

“Is Myatt an agent provocateur, a shit-disturber who can’t settle upon a radical philosophy, something more, or something less? It’s difficult to assess motive, but consider that he has been arrested numerous times for such things as writing and disseminating “practical terrorist guides” [and] on suspicion of conspiracy to murder. These cases have always been dropped due to “lack of evidence.” Does he enjoy protection? The record is suggestive that he does. And if it appears so, then we should ask the next question: Why?

Myatt may seem to have flitted from one politico-religious philosophy to another, but there is a terrible thread of continuity and rigour through his life and writings that suggests he is much more than a disingenuous provocateur. Naziism and Islamicism have served, in turn, as modalities of disruption for what remains at core an occult working to sow general chaos and division – the necessary passage of “Helter Skelter” to break down the Old Order, before the founding of the New.

So again: whose interests are served by there being a David Myatt? Is he is own man – or men – or does he belong to someone else? Or is it something else – an intelligence service perhaps.” {12}

As one proponent of this interpretation suggested, the O9A

“may well have been created by a state asset as a means of gathering intelligence and recruiting suitable individuals to undertake acts of subversion, extremism, and terrorism, under the pretext of occult training.” {13}

In the “Faustian quest” interpretation, Myatt – according to one academic, undertook

“a global odyssey which took him on extended stays in the Middle East and East Asia, accompanied by studies of religions ranging from Christianity to Islam in the Western tradition and Taoism and Buddhism in the Eastern path. In the course of this Siddhartha-like search for truth, Myatt sampled the life of the monastery in both its Christian and Buddhist forms.” {14}

In the “youthful fanatic who slowly over decades changes” interpretation, Myatt was an arrogant idealist who selfishly placed some cause before family and loved ones but whose varied experiences over decades gradually changed him, with there being no “Siddhartha-like search for truth” and no “underlying sinister esoteric plots”. Instead, as he wrote in his autobiography Myngath,

“As often in my life, it seemed as if the Fates revealed to me the direction in which I should go. Thus, and yet again, there was a certain period of drifting, by me, until a particular course of life seemed obvious, even to me.” {15}

Conclusion

The fact that Myatt’s life – as currently documented – is open to various interpretations is interesting, with it being for us to decide which interpretation to accept based on what level of knowledge of Myatt’s life and works we possess, on what aspect or aspects of his life and works we concentrate on, and – perhaps most important of all – on whether or not we already have a prejudicial opinion of the man.

At present, neither the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation nor the “government agent provocateur” interpretation are evidentially supported by primary sources relating to the life and writings of Myatt {16}{17}. Instead, they are based on non-evidential assumptions – often concerning Myatt’s intent – or, in case of academics and in the matter of the O9A, on fallacious reasoning as for example in the committal by Senholt of the Fallacy of Incomplete Evidence {18} and the committal of the fallacy of Illicit Transference by Massimo Introvigne {19} and by Della E. Campion. {20}

Since there is no scholarly biography of Myatt’s life based both on primary sources and on a detailed analyses of his post-2011 writings, his poetry, and his “philosophy of pathei-mathos” {21} the “sinister esoteric plots” interpretation and the “government agent provocateur” interpretation constitute personal opinion and/or serve (i) as examples of a lack of scholarly research, (ii) as examples of the use of forgeries, such as Diablerie and Bealuwes Gast {22}, and (iii) as examples of fallacious reasoning.

My own detailed study of currently accessible primary sources – sources {17} essential to understanding Myatt’s life and to placing his extremist decades into perspective – inclines me to favour the “youthful fanatic who slowly over decades changes” interpretation.

For example, Myatt wrote in 2012 that

“what exposed my hubris – what for me broke down that certitude-of-knowing which extremism breeds and re-presents – was not something I did; not something I achieved; not something related to my character, my nature, at all. Instead, it was a gift offered to me by two others – the legacy left by their tragic early dying. That it took not one but two personal tragedies – some thirteen years apart – for me to accept and appreciate the gift of their love, their living, most surely reveals my failure, the hubris that for so long suffused me, and the strength and depth of my so lamentable extremism.” {23}

In a 2012 letter written to a BBC journalist and later included in his book Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination, {24} – both of which are primary sources – Myatt wrote,

“The problem in the past had been me, my lack of understanding of myself and my egoism. It was my fault: not the place, not the time, not the people, for I so desired with that arrogance of youth to exchange this paradise, here, for those ideas, the idealism, the abstractions, I carried around in my prideful hubriatic head. Seldom content, for long, since happiness came with – was – the pursuit, or the gratification of my personal desires. So destructive, so very destructive. So hurtful, inconsiderate, selfish, profane.”

In 2014 he wrote,

“In a very personal sense, my philosophy of pathei-mathos is expiative, as are my writings concerning extremism, such as my Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination published last year. Also expiative is my reclusiveness. But such things – as is only just and fitting – do little to offset the deep sadness felt, except in fleeting moments.” {25}

Such are the words, the feelings, of someone who as a result of pathei-mathos has been interiorly changed. Someone who – unusually, having spent forty years as a revolutionary activist, as “a theoretician of terror” {26} who was regarded as a “principal proponent of contemporary neo-Nazi ideology and theoretician of revolution” {1} – has moved from extremist to mystic. {27}

It is my conclusion that it is only those who have not studied or who are ignorant of currently accessible Myattian primary sources who can maintain that “Myatt flitted from one cause to another” or who can believe fallacious interpretations such as that involving “sinister esoteric plots”.

Morena Kapiris
May 2018 ev
v.1.02

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{1} Michael, George. The New Media and the Rise of Exhortatory Terrorism. Strategic Studies Quarterly (United States Air Force), Volume 7 Issue 1, Spring 2013.

{2} Michael, George. The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, 2006. p. 142ff.

{3} Jon B. Perdue. The War of All the People: The Nexus of Latin American Radicalism and Middle Eastern Terrorism. Potomac Books, 2012. p.70-71.

{4} Mark Weitzman. Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus, in Thomas Greven: Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte in der Ära der Globalisierung. 1 Auflage. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006

{5} Terrorism and Communications – Countering the Terrorist Information Cycle, Slovakia, April 2005. The document is available from the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism at http://www.ict.org.il/Article.aspx?ID=929 [accessed May 2018].

{6} Per Faxneld. Post-Satanism, Left Hand Paths, and Beyond in The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity, Oxford University Press (2012), p.207.

{7} Raine, Susan. The Devil’s Party (Book review). Religion, Volume 44, Issue 3, July 2014.

{8} Senholt, Jacob C. The Sinister Tradition. Conference paper presented at Satanism in the Modern World, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 19-20th of November, 2009. A copy is available at https://www.webcitation.org/6bpiHBIrr [accessed May 2018].

{9} Monette, Connell. Mysticism in the 21st Century. Sirius Academic Press. 2013, p.89.

{10} David Myatt, The Septenary Anados, And The Quest For Lapis Philosophicus, in A Modern Mysterium: The Enigma of Myatt And The O9A. e-text 2018. A gratis open access copy is available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/myattian-mysterium-v7.pdf [accessed May 2018].

{11} Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen (editors), The Devil’s Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012. p.269.

{12} Jeff Wells, Rigorous Intuition blog, August 2005.

{13} David Myatt: Agent Provocateur? e-text, 2009. Available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/agent-provocateur/ [accessed May 2018].

{14} Kaplan, Jeffrey. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. p. 216ff; p.512f

{15} Myatt, David. Myngath. Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life. CreateSpace, 2013. ISBN 9781484110744

{16} Primary sources in regard to Myatt’s life would include original documentation relating to his neo-nazi decades (such as criminal proceedings, police interviews), and documentation relating to his decade as a Muslim and his time as a Christian monk.

{17} Primary currently accessible sources regarding both his life and writings include the following post-2011 published works:

° The Numinous Way of Pathei-Mathos.
° Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination.
° Religion, Empathy, and Pathei-Mathos.
° Myngath.
° One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods.
° Sarigthersa.
° One Exquisite Silence: Some Autobiographical Poems.
° Such Respectful Wordful Offerings: Selected Essays Of David Myatt.

All the above works, and others, are available as gratis open access (pdf) documents from https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2018/03/09/david-myatt-opera-omnia/ [Accessed May 2018].

{18} Myatt, David. The Logical Fallacy of Incomplete Evidence – A Case Study, in A Matter Of Honour, 2013, e-text. Available at https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/about/a-matter-of-honour-2/ [accessed May 2018].

{19} Scott, Kerri. The Authority Of Individual Judgment And The Fallacy Of Illicit Transference, in The Peculiar Matter Of Myatt And Long, 2018, e-text. The essay is included in A Modern Mysterium, op.cit.

{20} Scott, Kerri. Another Academic Misinterpretation Of The O9A, 2018, e-text. Available at https://omega9alpha.wordpress.com/2018/04/24/another-academic-misinterpretation/ [accessed May 2018].

{21} An overview of his philosophy of pathei-mathos is given in J.R. Wright & R. Parker, The Mystic Philosophy Of David Myatt. CreateSpace, 2106. ISBN 978-1523930135.

{22} Myatt, in his A Matter Of Honour, op.cit., describes both those purported autobiographies of “Anton Long” as forgeries. See also (i) R. Parker, Bealuwes Gast: A Study in Forgery, 2014, e-text, available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/bealuwes-gast/ [Accessed May 2018] and (ii) R. Parker, A Skeptic Reviews Diablerie, 2013, e-text, available at https://regardingdavidmyatt.wordpress.com/a-sceptics-review-of-diablerie/ [Accessed May 2018].

The thesis regarding Myatt being Anton Long proposed by academic Goodrick-Clark in his 2002 book Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity is based entirely on his assumption that Myatt wrote Diablerie. Goodrick-Clark provided no evidence from primary sources to support his assumption.

That Goodrick-Clark’s book has been cited by others – including some academics – as “proof” of Myatt being Anton Long is an example of those others committing the fallacy of Argumentum ad Verecundiam.

{23} Pathei-Mathos – Genesis of My Unknowing. 2012. The essay is included as an appendix in Myatt’s autobiography Myngath.

{24} Myatt, David. Understanding and Rejecting Extremism: A Very Strange Peregrination. CreateSpace, 2013. ISBN ISBN 9781484854266.

{25} Myatt, David. Some Questions For DWM, included in One Vagabond In Exile From The Gods. CreateSpace, 2014. ISBN 978-1502396105.

{26} Theoretician of Terror, Searchlight, July 2000.

{27} J.R. Wright & R. Parker, op.cit.


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