The Myattian Way of Lying

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David Myatt

David Myatt

It was with some amusement that I read – at disparate times some months apart – what two people wrote this year about Mr Myatt and lying. One blogger questioned how sincere Myatt was in his writings and wondered whether he deliberately spread ‘disinformation’ about himself, while an academic wrote in a recent book that “if scholarship has correctly identified him as the mastermind behind the Order of Nine Angles [then his denial of being Anton Long] does not bode well for his sincerity.”

I was reminded of their words (and so many similar ones) today when reading a column in The Guardian, and suggest that they and others – given their wonderment about and accusations regarding Myatt lying – read what the Guardian columnist Andrew Brown had to say in the Saturday 30 July 2016 edition of that newspaper.

Here, a few quotations from that column which may possibly answer their wonderment regarding and accusations about Mr Myatt lying.

“Why do the English lie so much? […] It’s not a coincidence that one of the classic novels about how to be an English gentleman is Beau Geste, in which the entire plot hinges on the moral necessity of lying. Honour demands all kinds of heroism and horrible deaths from the brothers, but it never asks them to tell the truth […] What makes English manners so peculiarly difficult is that you can never be entirely certain the person you are talking to is in fact lying. Sometimes they will be entirely sincere, even when it is not to their advantage to do so. Sometimes they will mean to be sincere, by saying something that you’re meant to understand is untrue, but fail, because you think they are telling the truth – and then the blame for their insincerity is entirely yours.”

R.P.
July 2016


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